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(AUDIO) NPPC Launches 'Keep America First in Agriculture' Campaign

WASHINGTON, D.C., June 25, 2019 – Today, the National Pork Producers Council (NPPC) launched "Keep American First in Agriculture," a new campaign to highlight the importance of establishing a proper regulatory framework for gene editing in American livestock. Andrew Bailey, National Pork...

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(AUDIO) NPPC Launches 'Keep America First in Agriculture' Campaign

WASHINGTON, D.C., June 25, 2019 – Today, the National Pork Producers Council (NPPC) launched "Keep American First in Agriculture," a new campaign to highlight the importance of establishing a proper regulatory framework for gene editing in American livestock. Andrew Bailey, National Pork...

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China hoping Trump-Xi meeting will help bridge differences

BEIJING (AP) — China hopes a meeting later this week between President Donald Trump and his Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping will help build trust and resolve "outstanding issues," a foreign ministry spokesman said Tuesday. Geng Shuang gave no details at a daily briefing, but there are hopes the ...

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Nebraska archeologists hope to find nothing in flooded farms

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — Archeologists surveying recently flooded Nebraska farms are hoping — for once — to not find anything historically significant as such a discovery could delay federal aid to the beleaguered farmers. After the massive spring floods receded, state agency History Nebraska s...

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New Tariffs Could Hit Pesticides

Proposed actions to impose new tariffs on China will hurt U.S. farmers and consumers was the key message delivered today by CropLife America (CLA) CEO Chris Novak in front of the United States Trade Representative (USTR) Section 301 Panel. As currently proposed at 25 percent, the new List 4 tariffs ...

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Nebraska Extension to offer record-keeping classes for farmers and ranchers

“Good Farmer to Great Manager” record-keeping classes will teach farmers and ranchers to keep accurate records for their operations. Nebraska Extension is offering the classes at three locations across the state in July. “In this class, you will learn about what information you should have ...

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Crops

Nebraska Extension to offer record-keeping classes for farmers and ranchers

“Good Farmer to Great Manager” record-keeping classes will teach farmers and ranchers to keep accurate records for their operations. Nebraska Extension is offering the classes at three locations across the state in July. “In this class, you will learn about what information you should have easily available as part of your farm or ranch records. When you have good records, everything from tax preparation, annual loan renewals, and financial analysis become much easier,” said Tina Barret, executive director of Nebraska Farm Business Inc. and course instructor. “More importantly, it will allow you to make financial management decisions that improve your business.” Keeping good records is less about using a certain software and more about gathering and organizing information, according to Barret. The difference between a good farmer and a great manager often comes down to knowing the true financial position of a farm. Good records make it possible to track an operation’s true financial position. Inaccurate records can lead to misguided management decisions. Class topics include: What are good records?; getting good tax records; moving to management records; and financial statements and ratios. Dates and locations are: Lincoln, July 18 – 19 at the Lancaster County Extension Office, 444 Cherrycreek Rd Bridgeport, July 25 – 26 at the Prairie Winds Community Center, 428 N Main St Grand Island, July 30 - 31 at the Hall County Extension Office, 3180 US-34 Each class will run from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. the first day, and 8 a.m. until noon the second day. The course fee is $50 per participant; class size is limited to 25 people per location. To register, visit https://wia.unl.edu/GFGM. The class is hosted by Nebraska Extension and is inspired by Annie's Project. Annie's Project is supported by Farm Credit Services of America in Nebraska.

Day 1, Kansas Wheat Harvest Report

This is day 1 of the Kansas Wheat Harvest Reports, brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. Harvest got off to a slow, labored start in south central Kansas over the weekend. The normal excitement and anticipation for wheat harvest can hardly be found in the area, as farmers who are normally finished by late June hop into their combines to face the muddy, dreary conditions for the first time this year. Farmers, who are not typically folks who complain about rain, need some hot, dry weather to really get combines rolling. According to USDA/NASS for the week ending June 23, winter wheat condition rated 4 percent very poor, 12 poor, 28 fair, 43 good and 13 excellent. Winter wheat coloring was 92 percent, behind 97 last year. Mature was 47 percent, well behind 82 last year. Harvested was 5 percent, well behind 48 last year and 36 for the five-year average. Mike Snell, manager of the Farmers Coop Equity Co., in Medicine Lodge, reported that his location took in their first load on the 18th, but have only had three dry days since for harvesting. His area, which would have normally finished their harvest this week, is only around five to ten percent harvested. The area received more rain over the weekend which halted progress. It's too early in the harvest to get a good feel for yields, but test weights (until yesterday) were hanging at about 62 pounds per bushel. Snell estimates the most recent rains may lower that average by about a pound. Scott Van Allen, a farmer near Clearwater, reported very similar conditions in his area. So far his family, which is normally completely done with harvest at this point, has only harvested around 250 acres. He estimates that with perfect harvesting conditions, he would need around ten days to wrap up. The one field the Van Allens completed yielded in the mid 40 bushels per acre, and he was pleasantly surprised with test weights ranging from 59-61.5 pounds per bushel. "Everyone's got bills to pay, and we have neighbors who are still trying to get milo and soybeans in. The jobs are starting to stack up around here," said Van Allen. "We were fortunate to escape most of the hail over the weekend, but the longer our wheat sits out there, the more vulnerable it is to Mother Nature's mood swings." The 2019 Harvest Report is brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. To follow along with harvest updates on Twitter, use #wheatharvest19.

Futures One Crop Progress Report *AUDIO*

Ninety-six percent of intended corn acres and 85% of intended soybean acres were planted as of Sunday, June 23, according to this week's USDA NASS Crop Progress report. For the portion of the crops that had emerged, corn was rated 56% in good-to-excellent condition and soybeans were rated 54% in good-to-excellent condition. Check this page throughout the afternoon for additional highlights from this week's report. To view weekly crop progress reports issued by National Ag Statistics Service offices in individual states, visit http://www.nass.usda.gov/…. Look for the U.S. map in the "Find Data and Reports by" section and choose the state you wish to view in the drop-down menu. Then look for that state's "Crop Progress & Condition" report. Clay Patton reports on Nebraska crops being among the best in the nation currently: https://post.futurimedia.com/krvnam/playlist/futures-one-crop-progress-report-nebraska-corn-6993.html National Crop Progress Summary This Last Last 5-Year Week Week Year Avg. Corn Planted 96 92 100 100 Corn Emerged 89 79 100 99 Soybeans Planted 85 77 100 97 Soybeans Emerged 71 55 94 91 Winter Wheat Headed 94 89 98 99 Winter Wheat Harvested 15 8 39 34 Spring Wheat Headed 7 2 30 29 Cotton Planted 96 89 99 98 Cotton Squaring 30 19 31 28 Cotton Setting Bolls 3 NA 6 5 Sorghum Planted 84 69 94 91 Sorghum Headed 17 15 20 20 Barley Emerged 97 92 99 99 Barley Headed 9 2 25 30 Oats Emerged 97 94 100 100 Oats Headed 43 33 65 68 Rice Emerged 97 94 100 100 Rice Headed 5 NA 6 8 ** National Crop Condition Summary (VP = Very Poor; P = Poor; F = Fair; G = Good; E = Excellent) This Week Last Week Last Year VP P F G E VP P F G E VP P F G E Corn 3 9 32 48 8 2 8 31 52 7 1 4 18 58 19 Soybeans 2 8 36 47 7 NA NA NA NA NA 1 4 22 58 15 Winter Wheat 3 8 28 46 15 2 7 27 51 13 15 19 29 28 9 Spring Wheat - 3 22 67 8 1 1 21 69 8 2 3 18 63 14 Cotton 4 13 33 45 5 4 11 36 42 7 1 18 39 35 7 Sorghum - 3 25 61 11 NA NA NA NA NA 3 9 32 51 5 Barley 1 4 23 64 8 1 6 17 63 13 1 3 13 65 18 Oats 2 5 29 56 8 2 4 28 58 8 3 3 22 59 13 Rice 1 6 27 52 14 1 6 30 51 12 - 5 25 57 13 ** National Soil Moisture Condition - 48 States (VS = Very Short; SH = Short; AD = Adequate; SR = Surplus) This Week Last Week Last Year VS SH AD SR VS SH AD SR VS SH AD SR Topsoil Moisture 2 8 64 26 2 10 67 21 8 18 61 13 Subsoil Moisture 2 8 65 25 2 8 68 22 9 20 62 9

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Livestock

Nebraska Cattlemen Sends Three Participants to NCBA's Young Cattlemen's Conference

LINCOLN, NE (June 25, 2019) - Three Nebraska beef leaders participated in 10 days of intensive leadership training and a three-city tour showcasing every facet of the beef industry during NCBA's 2019 Young Cattlemen's Conference (YCC). Reiss Bruning, Sarah Kabes and Chance McLean were the Nebraska representatives that participated in this year's NCBA YCC program. They began their journey in Denver Colorado with classroom sessions providing background knowledge about NCBA and the work it conducts on behalf of its members and the entire beef community. Before leaving Colorado, the group toured Five Rivers Cattle Feeding's Kuner Feedyard, JBS processing plant and a Safeway flagship store where they learned how beef is being marketed to consumers on the retail level. "I am so thankful for this opportunity to meet so many other people in the industry to bounce ideas off of and to learn more about the industry I love" said Sarah Kabes. The Nebraska natives along with more than 50 other participants then traveled to Chicago where they made stops at Hillshire Farms, McDonald's global headquarters, and OSI Inc., one of the largest beef patty manufacturers in the nation. "NCBA Young Cattlemen's Conference was an amazing experience, that covered all aspects from - Pasture to Plate. I am thankful for what our local, state, and national affiliates do to support the beef industry. This was an experience I will never forget. Thanks Nebraska Cattlemen for allowing me this opportunity" said Chance McLean. The 2019 YCC class finished its whirlwind tour in Washington, D.C., where participants learned how NCBA's policy work impacts their operations and the broader industry. After an in-depth policy issue briefing from NCBA's lobbyists and staff experts, participants took to Capitol Hill, visiting more than 200 congressional offices to advocate for industry policy priorities. "I felt very fortunate to be selected to attend the National Conference. Being a part of this powerful group of young leaders from across the US was an incredible learning experience and networking opportunity that created invaluable lifelong relationships. The issues we individually face both politically and day-to-day are diverse and being able to discuss and understand how to solve those problems broadened our intellectual horizons and instilled a deep sense of confidence in everyone. I hope to use the vast amount of institutional knowledge we gained on this trip to build on the great foundation NCBA has established to ensure a bright and prosperous future for generations of cattlemen to come," said Reiss Bruning.

US government investigating poultry price-fixing claims

The U.S. government is investigating price-fixing charges against the country's biggest poultry companies. The Department of Justice tipped its hand last week when it requested a temporary halt to discovery proceedings in a 2016 class-action lawsuit filed by food distributor Maplevale Farms. Maplevale accuses Tyson Foods Inc., Perdue Farms Inc. and others of conspiring to fix poultry prices between 2008 and 2016. The suit claims the companies shared information and restricted supply by destroying breeder hens. The government said it wants a six-month delay to protect an ongoing grand jury investigation. A federal court judge in Chicago is scheduled to rule on the request Thursday. The case is one of nearly 40 filed by grocers, restaurants and others against the poultry companies. Kroger and Walmart are among those who have sued.

4-Hers boost leaderships skills and civic engagement through 4-H Citizenship Washington Focus

 A group of 27 4-H members from the Nebraska Panhandle learned about political processes in the living classroom of the nation’s capital as part of Citizenship Washington Focus (CWF), an intensive 4-H civic engagement program for high-school youth held at the National 4-H Conference Center in Chevy Chase, Md. The youths engaged with youths from five other states in lively but civil discussion and debate of several current issues then drafted and debated bills to address those issues. They also spent much of the week venturing out into Washington, D.C., touring government agencies, monuments and memorials, and meeting with Congressional representatives. The western Nebraska group was joined at the week-long CWF session by 4-H delegations from Utah, Montana, Illinois, South Carolina, and North Dakota. Altogether, 140 4-Hers took part. The  Panhandle contingent included 12 youth from Garden County, seven from Cheyenne County, and eight from Deuel county. The adult leader was Sarah Paisley, a Nebraska Extension 4-H Youth Development Educator from Oshkosh. The group included these 4-Hers: Garden County: Chesney Stanczyk, Cole Coss, Drake Yates, Dutch Yates, Emily Levick, Josie Marquez, Kaitlyn Hunt, Kelsee Moffat, Maddie Lake, Madison Rauch, Mallory Zorn, Ty Coss. Cheyenne County: Allison Lofton, Dyson Grabowski, Ella Miller, Holden Syverson, Jasmine Deeds, Kalid Radmacher, Kord McMillen. Deuel County: Caitlyn Koenen, Chase Isenbart, Elizabeth Whiting, Emma Schneider, Ethan Naylor, Keeley Naylor, Nolan Ortgies, Rheya Reichman. Paisley said any 4-H member who wants to go and can raise the money, can make the trip. Several adult sponsors accompanied the group. The southern Panhandle delegation met with 3rd District Rep. Adrian Smith on the Capitol steps for a question-and-answer session and photo opportunity. They also met with a representative from U.S. Sen. Ben Sasse’s office. Once on the CWF campus, 4-H members from different states are grouped to work together on issues. This cross-grouping process was new this year, but Paisley said it was active, “so the kids could get a little better idea of how to interact and debate and talk about hot topics with other people. I really love that aspect. Our kids really need that skill, to be able to talk to people, especially when hot topics came up.” Several of the students called CWF a life-changing experience. “It was a great learning experience,” said Chase Isenbart of Deuel County, who liked venturing out into the nation’s capital as well as learning and discussing the issues with his fellow 4-H members. “It changed everything for me. I thought I knew some of the stuff. But some of the stuff they told us I had no clue about.” Ethan Naylor of Deuel County said: “I learned a lot about political opinions and other people’s political views and how it differs from state to state and even in a lot of cases county to county. It’s interesting how a lot of that can change based off of your background.” In being exposed to different people, and their backgrounds and viewpoints, he said he gained confidence in his own opinions as well. Kaitlyn Hunt of Garden County added, “I think the CWF trip was a great experience and an opportunity to learn different things and get in communication with others, and have the opportunity to meet others that aren’t always like you.” Community service was one of the lessons taken back home by Ella Miller of Cheyenne County. “What I learned this week was how to help people in your community, and (also to) just learn about civil discourse.” She added, “I loved meeting different people. I got to learn a lot of different people’s names and what their interests were.” CWF not only strengthens young people’s understanding of the government’s civic process, but it also boosts their leadership skills, communication skills, and overall confidence.

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Technology

South Dakota Company Receives International Acclaim For Improving Feed Performance In Aquaculture

COLOGNE, Del. /PRNewswire/ -- Prairie AquaTech of Brookings, SD (USA) is the 2019 winner of the internationally curated Aquafeed Innovation Award for Ingredients. The award was presented to the company during the 2019 VICTAM International Feed & Grain event held in Cologne, following the"Aquafeed Horizons" technical conference. Independent judges from Asia, Europe, Australia, New Zealand and the USA selected Prairie AquaTech on the merits of its protein ingredient, "ME-PRO." The ingredient was designed to provide the aquaculture industry an effective and responsible alternative to reliance upon wild-caught stocks of forage fish. ME-PRO uses a patented process to enhance plant protein. The result is an exceptionally high quality protein ingredient that's been proven to be responsibly sourced, provide excellent performance in feed mills and on fish and shrimp farms, and have a positive effect on the environment. Though ME-PRO's source and performance are remarkable, the Aquafeed Innovation Award was ultimately bestowed on account of the ingredient's demonstrated ability to significantly lower phosphorus effluent from aquaculture into ground water, lakes, rivers and the ocean. Phosphorus discharge is one of the leading contributors to environmental pollution around the world. Excess phosphorus in the water system contributes to a harmful process called eutrophication, resulting in lower water quality, higher costs, and stagnation of aquaculture growth. Lucia Barreiro, editor of industry news source aquafeed.comand co-producer of the Aquafeed Horizons event stated, "The aquaculture industry succeeds on the quality and applicability of innovation. We absolutely must meet and exceed upon the challenges that present themselves to our industry. Prairie AquaTech's ME-PRO is not only an excellent protein ingredient, it's helping the industry become more successful. They should be proud of their work and we wish them continued success." Prairie AquaTech CEO, Mark Luecke, was present at the award ceremony and replied, "Aquafeed is a globally recognized source of industry news and information – their recognition of our work is very important. This award is the result of our team's passion for developing high quality products that support the aquaculture value chain, and our persistence to achieve production at scale." Prairie AquaTech has recently completed construction of its first commercial-scale production facility in Volga, South Dakota. At full production capacity, the facility will produce 30,000 metric tons of ME-PRO from non-GMO soybeans per year. ME-PRO has been successfully used in aqua feed formulations around the world in multiple species, such as salmonids, bass, and shrimp. ME-PRO was developed by a partnership between South Dakota State University and South Dakota Innovation Partners, an investment company established to start and manage companies dedicated to meeting crucial challenges in health and nutrition. Prairie AquaTech is part of South Dakota Innovation Partners' portfolio of companies. For more information on ME-PRO, www.MEPROPowered.comor search "Prairie AquaTech" on YouTube.

FarrPro's Haven Wins National Hog Farmer "Producer's Choice" Award

IOWA CITY, Iowa -- FarrPro, an Iowa based ag tech startup, has won the 2019 National Hog Farmer New Product Tour "Producer's Choice" Award with their Haven product. The Producer's Choice Award goes to the product receiving the most votes cast online by readers of National Hog Farmer (NHF) magazine and website. The Haven was also selected by a panel of pork industry experts as an overall finalist in the NHF New Product Tour based on the panel's assessment of how effective the product would be in helping producers save money and improve efficiency. Amos Petersen, FarrPro CEO & co-founder responded to the news by saying, "It's an incredible honor to be chosen by the readership of National Hog Farmer (NHF) for the Producer's Choice Award. For us it is a validation of the philosophy that has driven development of this product from day one: listen closely to what producers want and find a way to give it to them. We hope that the Haven is the first of many FarrPro products that will drive value to producers by solving old problems in new ways." Winning the award is quite an achievement because many of the products entered were submitted by established companies already selling products in the ag marketplace. "As a startup, we don't have the name recognition or a catalog of other products known by NHF readers so the fact that they voted for the Haven shows they understand what it's designed to do which is reduce pre-wean mortality and save energy. The Haven does both resulting in more healthy pigs being delivered to the nursery, using less energy, and that puts more money in the producer's pocket," said Chris Hanson, FarrPro co-founder and Director of Business Development. The FarrPro Haven consists of an elongated parabolic reflector and a heat element that emits long-wave infrared energy creating a microclimate for the piglets in the farrowing pen. Its design utilizes the partition wall between farrowing crates, providing semi-enclosed micro-climates for two neighboring creeps that are safely away from crush danger areas. The Haven delivers heat energy which feels like sunshine, and penetrates into the pigs' bodies, warming them thoroughly. Its design also keeps heat from spilling onto the sow, keeping her cool and stress-free which promotes healthy milk production and overall sow comfort.

(Audio) UNL Students Claim International Tractor Design Title

University of Nebraska- Lincoln students competed in the 2019 International Quarter-Scale Tractor Student Design Competition May 30-June 2 in Peoria, IL, and ultimately claimed the international title. A-Team Captain Zak Kurkowski said the competition lasts over the course of an entire year.  Each team is initially given a 31-horsepower Briggs & Stratton engine and a set of Titan tires. From there, aside from modifying the engine, the teams build and design the tractor as they choose. Click here to listen to the full audio with Zak Kurkowski. Kurkowski said his team started planning the design and build in summer and early fall with the goal of having a running tractor by Christmas break. Although they didn't meet that goal, he said the tractor was driving and ready for the final touches by spring break. At the competition in Illinois, the tractor is put to the test in three main performance categories: a tractor pull, a durability course and a maneuverability course. The tractor is also judged on design features, including safety, manufacturability , serviceability and ergonomics. The team is also required to give a presentation and submit a written report. [caption id="attachment_390277" align="alignnone" width="300"] International Quarter-Scale Tractor Student Design Competition - UNL Team (Photo Courtesy Zak Kurkowski)[/caption] This year's A-Team focused the tractor's design around durability - a category Kurkowski said has been troublesome in previous years. The UNL X-Team, which is made of freshmen and sophomores, also competed in Illinois, claiming second place in their division. The X-division is tasked with taking the previous year's tractor and making changes and improvements. Kurkowski is a Grant, Nebraska, native and a May 2020 graduate of the University of Nebraska - Lincoln. He currently works as a design engineer for AGCO Corporation.

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Ag Policy

(AUDIO) NPPC Launches 'Keep America First in Agriculture' Campaign

WASHINGTON, D.C., June 25, 2019 – Today, the National Pork Producers Council (NPPC) launched "Keep American First in Agriculture," a new campaign to highlight the importance of establishing a proper regulatory framework for gene editing in American livestock. Andrew Bailey, National Pork Producer Council's Lead Counsel for Science and Technology Gene editing technology, which introduces useful genetic variation into food animal breeding programs, promises significant animal health benefits, including a natural immunity to disease and a reduction in the need for antibiotic use. "Gene editing is a huge step forward for America's farmers, as it offers a powerful new way to combat animal disease," said Dr. Dan Kovich, NPPC's deputy director of Science & Technology. "With gene editing, livestock breeders can knock out specific genes that make animals vulnerable to viral infections. Healthier animals benefit both farmers and consumers," he said. While countries like Canada, Brazil and Argentina are moving quickly on this advancement to gain competitive advantage in the market, the U.S. is running the risk of falling far behind as a result of a regulatory land grab by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Under FDA regulation, gene editing faces an impractical, lengthy and expensive approval process, threatening hundreds of thousands of jobs and nearly six percent of U.S. Gross Domestic Product. Additionally, the FDA's regulation inaccurately classifies livestock as drugs and farms as drug-manufacturing facilities, creating significant challenges for the international trade in animals and animal products. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is the only agency prepared to effectively regulate this new technology. It already has a review process in place for genetic editing in plants under its Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), which can easily be adopted for livestock. The USDA also has the understanding and history of working directly with livestock and agriculture, unlike the FDA, which regulates packaged food, drugs and medical devices. "Allowing the FDA to regulate gene editing could drive elite animal breeding out of the U.S., long the international leader, and place U.S. producers at a potentially catastrophic competitive disadvantage with foreign competitors," said Dr. Bradley Wolter, a leading pork producer and President of The Maschhoffs, a company that produces over 4 million market hogs per year. "International competitors that commercialize this technology will gain as much as a 15 percent production efficiency advantage over U.S. pork. It's critical that America remains the global leader in agricultural innovation and gives regulatory oversight to the USDA, the agency that is most equipped to do so." NPPC launched its "Keep America First in Agriculture" campaign with amedia teleconference hosted by leading researchers, veterinarians, producers and industry experts, including Dr. Alison Van Eenennaam, Animal Biotechnology and Genomics Extension Specialist, University of California, Davis; Dr. Kovich; Andrew Bailey, NPPC Lead Counsel for Science and Technology; and Dr. Wolter. For the audiorecording of the teleconference, click here. To learn more about "Keep America First in Agriculture," visit www.nppc.org/kafa and to learn more about gene editing, read NPPC's latest "Meat of the Matter" by Dr. Kovichhere.

China hoping Trump-Xi meeting will help bridge differences

BEIJING (AP) — China hopes a meeting later this week between President Donald Trump and his Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping will help build trust and resolve "outstanding issues," a foreign ministry spokesman said Tuesday. Geng Shuang gave no details at a daily briefing, but there are hopes the planned encounter at the G-20 summit in Japan will help lower the temperature in the trade war between the world's two largest economies. As part of preparations, U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer spoke by phone Monday with the top Chinese negotiator, Vice Premier Liu He. "We certainly hope that the meeting will help the two states to promote mutual trust, resolve their differences, and resolve some of the outstanding issues we are facing now," Geng said. China remains "committed to working with the U.S. to develop China-U.S. relations based on coordination and cooperation," Geng said. The meeting in Osaka is the first opportunity for the two leaders to discuss the trade dispute face-to-face since Trump said he was ready to target the $300 billion in Chinese imports that he hasn't already hit with tariffs, extending them to everything China ships to the United States. Trump has already imposed 25% tariffs on $250 billion in Chinese imports and China has retaliated with tariffs on U.S. goods. The sides are at an impasse after 11 rounds of talks that have failed to overcome U.S. concerns over China's acquisition of American technology and its massive trade surplus.

New Tariffs Could Hit Pesticides

Proposed actions to impose new tariffs on China will hurt U.S. farmers and consumers was the key message delivered today by CropLife America (CLA) CEO Chris Novak in front of the United States Trade Representative (USTR) Section 301 Panel. As currently proposed at 25 percent, the new List 4 tariffs would increase costs several hundred million dollars per year that would impact CLA members, farmers and consumers. “While we appreciate the Administration’s willingness to undertake tough measures to discourage trade practices that disadvantage our industry, we believe these proposed tariffs will have immediate, negative effects on farmers, consumers, and our members. After the Administration imposed tariffs last September on certain agrochemicals, the producer price index for these products skyrocketed,” stated Novak. Many of the chemicals covered by the proposed tariffs are not produced in the U.S., and it is not easy to resource these products. All new sources for pesticide active ingredients used in the U.S. market are subject to a time-consuming Environmental Protection Agency clearance process. Due to the limited existing capacity outside of China, and the difficulties of bringing new sources online, it is inevitable that the additional tariffs will increase the prices of critical tools for U.S. farmers. Novak, who testified on behalf of CLA and RISE (Responsible Industry for a Sound Environment), added, “Beyond our farm customers, these tariffs will also impact nurseries, lawn and garden companies, and consumers who rely upon our products to protect their homes and businesses. The burden of these tariffs will fall disproportionately on the shoulders of American farmers, businesses, and consumers without truly advancing the cause of free and fair trade.” CLA is working with its partners in the agricultural community to reach out to members of Congress and officials at USTR to help communicate the impact the proposed tariffs will have on farmers across the U.S.

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Markets

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KNEB KTIC KAWL KXSP - Omaha KSID - Sidney KCSR - Chadron KNCY - Nebraska City KWBE - Beatrice/Fairbury