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Nebraska Motor Fuels Tax Rate to Drop July 1

LINCOLN, Neb. (AP) — Nebraska motorists could soon pay less to the state at gas pumps. The Department of Revenue announced Wednesday that the state motor fuels tax will drop fourth-tenths of a cent on July 1, to 28 cents per gallon (nearly 4 liters) from 28.4 cents. The fuels tax is composed...

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Nebraska Motor Fuels Tax Rate to Drop July 1

LINCOLN, Neb. (AP) — Nebraska motorists could soon pay less to the state at gas pumps. The Department of Revenue announced Wednesday that the state motor fuels tax will drop fourth-tenths of a cent on July 1, to 28 cents per gallon (nearly 4 liters) from 28.4 cents. The fuels tax is composed...

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Reclamation will lower Guernsey Reservoir for annual silt run

MILLS, Wyo. - The Wyoming Area Office of the Bureau of Reclamation in Mills, Wyo., will be lowering the water level in Guernsey Reservoir in preparation for the annual silt run. “The silt run is an operation which provides silt-laden water to Goshen, Gering-Fort Laramie, and Pathfinder Irrigati...

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Are Your Beans Suddenly Wilting? Seedling Diseases May Be to Blame

With most Midwest soybeans approaching flowering, seedling diseases may be far from growers' minds. But after heavy rains last week, parts of many picture-perfect bean fields are suddenly wilting and shriveling, said University of Illinois plant pathologist Nathan Kleczewski. A handful of diseases a...

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(Video) Morning Agriculture News Update - June 20, 2018

Susan Littlefield reports on the latest in agriculture news. Story 1: The U.S. House faces a Friday deadline to re-vote on the current farm bill proposal. Story 2: Farm Credit Outlook Shows Prices for Grains to Strengthen Story 3: Secretary Perdue Comments on Canada Dairy Issue ...

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Governor Ricketts, Japan’s Consul General Highlight New University-Kewpie Partnership

DAVID CITY – Governor Pete Ricketts and the visiting Consul General of Japan in Chicago, Naoki Ito, toured the Henningsen Foods plant in David City, Nebraska.  The visit occurred on the heels of a newly-announced strategic partnership agreement between Henningsen’s Tokyo-based parent Kewpie Co...

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Crops

Reclamation will lower Guernsey Reservoir for annual silt run

MILLS, Wyo. - The Wyoming Area Office of the Bureau of Reclamation in Mills, Wyo., will be lowering the water level in Guernsey Reservoir in preparation for the annual silt run. “The silt run is an operation which provides silt-laden water to Goshen, Gering-Fort Laramie, and Pathfinder Irrigation Districts under contract with Reclamation,” said Carlie Ronca, Wyoming Area Manager. On the evening of July 4, the release of water from Glendo Reservoir will be decreased from approximately 5,000 cubic feet per second (cfs) to a flow of approximately 3,000 cfs. The decreased flow will cause a rapid decline of the Guernsey Reservoir level of approximately 25 feet starting July 5 - 10. By Monday, July 9, the boat ramps at Guernsey Reservoir will no longer be useable due to the low reservoir level. Water being released from Glendo Reservoir will flow through Guernsey Reservoir flushing silt from Guernsey Reservoir into the canals of downstream irrigators. The silt run will begin on July 11 and is anticipated to continue through July 24. Beginning on the morning of July 25, the release of water from Glendo Reservoir will be rapidly increased to refill Guernsey Reservoir. The level of Guernsey Reservoir is expected to be suitable for boating again by the morning of July 27.  The reservoir will continue to rise by several feet daily throughout the weekend and reach the normal reservoir operation level on Monday, July 30. Boaters, recreationists, and irrigators should take proper precautions regarding changing river flows below Glendo and Guernsey Reservoirs and the rapid lowering and refilling of Guernsey Reservoir.

Racing Against the Rain in Central Kansas

Combines are rolling quickly along the plains as farmers prepare for rains that may stall their harvest progress. Many areas in south central and eastern Kansas have harvested their final acres, but the race against rain is well under way in western, central and north central portions of the state. While this precipitation is welcome for those who have fall crops, it's too little, too late for the 2018 Kansas wheat crop. Jennifer Princ, manager of the Midway Coop Association in Luray, reported that they received their first load on June 14 and are currently around 30 percent complete with the area's harvest. This year's yields are averaging around 35-40 bushels per acre, but Princ has heard reports of yields as low as 20 and as high as 67. Princ estimates the final average yield will be well below the area's normal yield average of 45-50 bushels per acre. While yields have fallen, Princ said that the average test weight is 61 pounds per bushel. Proteins are averaging 12.4 percent, 1.2 percent higher than 2017. Lack of moisture isn't the only thing holding back this year's crop. Princ said her farmers are reporting quite a few white heads in fields caused by several late freezes. In addition, while ripe wheat is being harvested quickly, there is a bit of green wheat still out in the field. "There's still quite a bit of green wheat in some of the fields out there," said Princ. "If we don't get the rain that was predicted this week, we'll probably have some guys who have to stall and wait for their wheat to dry down. It all just varies with variety and plant date." Randy Acker, manager of the Meade Coop Elevator in Meade, reports that the area is around 90 percent harvested. If they don't receive rain, they will wrap up in about two or three days. His location took in its first load on June 9. "This year will be a short harvest in duration and a short harvest in receipts," reported Acker. "We didn't catch enough rain to raise a wheat crop but I am surprised by the quality." The Meade Coop Elevator is averaging about 60 pounds per bushel in test weight. While there was no substantial disease pressure in the area, weeds in fields may quickly become a serious issue for farmers who aren't finished harvesting. "If it rains, some acres may have to be abandoned because of the excessive weed growth," said Acker. "Some things you can control, but weather isn't one of them." Terry Mohl, location manager of United Prairie Ag in Hugoton, reported the area is about 50 percent harvested. Mohl said he thinks this year's yields will be considerably less than average - not great, but better than expected. He expects that when the last bushel has been brought into his location, they will have taken in about half the total bushels they would in an average year. The wheat is averaging 60 pounds per bushel for test weight, and protein is averaging close to 12. Mohl also showed concern for the lack of precipitation in the area. "We went half a year without any measurable precipitation," said Mohl. "We have 10 days of harvest left if we don't get any weather, but the clouds are building up now. It won't do us any good for our wheat, but the rest of our crops could sure use a drink." Kansas Grain & Feed Association, the Kansas Wheat Commission and Kansas Association of Wheat Growers provide updates of the Kansas wheat harvest. Today's update is the seventh report of the 2018 harvest.

Are Your Beans Suddenly Wilting? Seedling Diseases May Be to Blame

With most Midwest soybeans approaching flowering, seedling diseases may be far from growers' minds. But after heavy rains last week, parts of many picture-perfect bean fields are suddenly wilting and shriveling, said University of Illinois plant pathologist Nathan Kleczewski. A handful of diseases are likely to blame, including Phytophthora, Rhizoctonia and Pythium -- and some fields are showing more than one, he said. "A lot of people assume this is Phytophthora, because of the rain, and some fields do have it, but a lot of the samples we're getting have multiple pathogens present," he said. Another potential cause is compaction, which has produced shallow root systems that could be drowning in wet soils, he added. A ONE-TWO PUNCH Kleczewski said some of the sickly soybean plants in Illinois are showing a dual infection from both Rhizoctonia and Phytophthora. Since these two diseases favor nearly opposite conditions -- Rhizoctonia likes hot, dry conditions for development, whereas Phytophthora thrives in wet soils -- some growers are left scratching their head, he noted. "We had basically two seasons so far with our soybeans," he said. "We had our dry, hot season, and then we had that recent deluge of water. And what you end up with is kind of a one-two punch to the plant." Rhizoctonia infections likely took hold earlier in the season and damaged the soybean's root system. "That fungus was chewing away on the roots and compromising that root system and causing cankers to develop, so plants likely lost a lot of their initial roots," he explained. "So they compensate by forming adventitious roots -- these shallow, weak little root systems." Then along came heavy rains, and Phytophthora entered the picture. "That deluge of rain inundated these fragile root systems, and then it doesn't take much infection to start to break down those plants," Kleczewski said. Other potential culprits of wilted soybean plants right now are Pythium and Fusarium, he added. Keep in mind that compacted soils can also produce wilting or sickly plants, as they limit root development and make it hard for a plant to handle either dry or saturated conditions. The best way to know what is ailing your particular field is to dig up the affected plants, examine them and consider sending them to a plant diagnostic lab. Here's a brief review of the most likely culprits: RHIZOCTONIA: Look for a soil-level canker on the stem, extending only about an inch or so upward, Kleczewski, said. "They will be somewhat sunken lesions, kind of red in color," he said. The stem will not be soft, as rhizoctonia is a "dry rot," he added. PHYTOPHTHORA: Normally, early season infections of this disease create wet, mushy roots that slough off easily on your fingers and cause emergence problems. At this time of year, symptoms will likely be soft, mushy stems with black or brown discoloration starting at the base and spreading steadily upward along the stem. PYTHIUM: Look for stunted roots with "rat-tailing," a condition where the outer root tissue sloughs off easily, leaving behind a stringy, white core of tissue, Kleczewski said. FUSARIUM: Though more of an opportunistic disease that invades a previously injured plant, Fusarium could also be the cause of a wilting soybean, Kleczewski noted. Look for brownish-red and mushy roots, with decaying internal tissue, he said. COMPACTION: Roots from soybean plants in compacted soils will branch out sharply at 90-degree angles just above the compaction layer. These shallow root systems can cause wilting in both hot and wet conditions, Kleczewski noted. In drier weather, the roots will struggle to reach water, and in wet soils, they will be too saturated to function properly. At this point in the season, there is no way to treat seedling diseases, but growers should scout anyway, Kleczewski said. Knowing which of these problems is at work in your fields is important to planning variety selection and seed treatments for future soybean fields. For example, Pythium and Phytophthora are oomycetes, which are not true fungi and thus don't respond to many common fungicides used in seed treatments. They require the use of active ingredients such as metalaxyl, mefanoxam and ethaboxam, which in turn don't work against fungus-based diseases like Fusarium and Rhizoctonia, Kleczewski explained. Soybean varieties with genetic resistance to Phytophthora are also available, he added.

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Livestock

Nebraska Cattlemen Sent Two Young Leaders to the 2018 NCBA Young Cattlemen's Conference

LINCOLN, NE (June 20, 2018) - In early June, 61 upcoming cattlemen and women leaders from across the Nation gathered together for the week long National Cattlemen's Beef Association 2018 Young Cattlemen's Conference. Among those participants were two young cattlemen future leaders from Nebraska, Terryn Drieling of Ashby and Scott Peterson of Valentine. NCBA's YCC program kicked off in Denver, Colorado with classroom type sessions. These sessions were designed to provide the participants with more information about NCBA and the work the organization conducts on behalf of members. Along with background information on NCBA the group participated in leadership development, media training and hands-on demonstrations of NCBA's consumer marketing programs. While in Colorado they got the opportunity to tour Five Rivers Cattle Feeding's Kuner Feedyard, the JBS processing plant as well as met with the executive team at JBS Headquarters. Prior to leaving Denver, participants also stopped at one of Safeway's flagship stores to learn more about beef marketing at the retail level, giving the group an in-depth understanding of every aspect of the beef supply chain. On their way to Washington D.C. the group stopped briefly in Chicago for a tour of Hillshire farms, the new McDonald's Campus and OSI, one of the nation's largest premiere beef patty producers. Washington, D.C., brought the young leaders face to face with the impacts of public policy on their operations and an in-depth briefing on current policy issues from NCBA lobbyist and policy experts. While at the Capitol the participants had the opportunity to advocate for industry policy priorities to 200 of their elected officials. "YCC was the experience that I needed to fully grasp the entire beef chain. Understanding the challenges of JBS and Tyson in staffing and marketing gave me a greater understanding of the challenges facing the beef industry as a whole. I am grateful to the Nebraska Cattlemen and all those individuals who assisted in my selection. This experience energizes me to continue to work for beef producers and to seek other ways of impacting the industry. The experiences and friendships will last a lifetime." Scott Peterson of Valentine, Nebraska. "I had high expectations going into YCC, and this trip exceeded them all. I learned something new at every stop, made solid connections, built lasting friendships, and was once again impressed by the NCBA team. The highlights for me were visiting with the McDonald's team, seeing how their burgers are made, and visiting our representative on the Hill. Kudos, to our team at Nebraska Cattlemen for being a constant voice for us not only within our state, but also in DC. I am forever grateful for the opportunity to attend YCC and look forward to what the future holds for the beef community." Terryn Drieling, Ashby Nebraska. NCBA's YCC program impacts these young producers with knowledge and experiences they had never known before. These types of programs are crucial to the future of the United States Beef Industry.

Erin Fitzgerald Hired to Lead U.S. Farmers & Ranchers Alliance as New CEO

ST LOUIS, Mo., (June 20, 2018) - In its ongoing mission to earn consumer trust in American agriculture, the U.S. Farmers & Ranchers Alliance has selected Erin Fitzgerald to lead the organization as its next chief executive officer. Erin Fitzgerald formerly served as Senior Vice President, Global Sustainability for the Innovation Center for U.S. Dairy®, a part of Dairy Management Inc.™ (DMI), which is a forum for the dairy community to address the needs and expectations of consumers.   "The USFRA Board of Directors is pleased to hire Erin Fitzgerald as our new CEO," said Chip Bowling, USFRA Vice Chair and Chair of the CEO Search Committee. "With an outstanding number of qualified candidates for the CEO position, Erin was the obvious choice to lead our organization through the next chapter of its history, and it was a unanimous decision by the board."   Under Fitzgerald's leadership at the Innovation Center for U.S. Dairy®, she enhanced dairy's contributions to a more sustainable food system by advancing the intersection of nutrition, health, hunger, food waste and impact. In her role, she conducted an environmental impact assessment that led to an industry-wide voluntary carbon reduction goal of 25 percent by 2020. Fitzgerald is recognized as a White House Champion of Change for Sustainable and Climate-Smart Agriculture, an Aspen Institute First Movers Fellow, and a Crain's Chicago 40 under 40 recipient. She is a graduate of the University of Notre Dame.   "American farmers and ranchers have an incredible legacy and will define the sustainable food systems of the future - I am grateful for the privilege to continue to work for the farmers across the United States who are committed to stewardship and inspire a sustainable future," said Erin Fitzgerald. "By creating a shared dialogue, from our farms to our consumers, we have a tremendous opportunity to advance the food systems of our future."   Fitzgerald will lead USFRA as it approaches its eighth year as an organization. Since its launch in October 2010, USFRA has held 30+ groundbreaking Food Dialogues which initiated important conversations, conducted cutting-edge research into consumer perceptions of agriculture, and produced the award-winning film FARMLAND. The U.S. Farmers & Ranchers Alliance and its 100 affiliates and industry partners look forward to working with Fitzgerald to engage with consumers and stakeholders to advance the dialogue about today's agriculture.   Jon Leafstedt, and Jim Gerardot, principals with the global executive search firm Kincannon & Reed, assisted the USFRA farmer-led search committee for the recruitment of Erin Fitzgerald as Chief Executive Officer. Fitzgerald will begin full time employment with USFRA on July 16, 2018.  

Meat 2.0? Clean Meat? Spat Shows the Power of Food Wording

NEW YORK (AP) — If meat is grown in a lab without slaughtering animals, what should it be called? That question has yet to be decided by regulators, but for the moment it's pitting animal rights advocates and others against cattle ranchers in a war of words. Supporters of the science are embracing "clean meat" to describe meat grown by replicating animal cells. Many in the conventional meat industry are irritated by the term and want to stamp it out before it takes hold. "It implies that traditional beef is dirty," says Danielle Beck, director of government affairs for the National Cattlemen's Beef Association. The spat shows the power of language as a new industry attempts to reshape eating habits. It's why the $49.5 billion U.S. beef, poultry, pork and lamb industry is mobilizing to claim ownership of the term "meat." Squabbles over language are erupting across the food business as established definitions for mayonnaise and milk are also challenged by the likes of vegan spreads and almond drinks. What gets to be considered "meat" is a particularly touchy subject as new companies come up with substitutes they say are just like the real thing. Impossible Burger's plant-based patty "bleeds" like beef. Companies such as Memphis Meats are growing meat by culturing animal cells, though it could be years before products are on shelves. Big meat producers like Tyson Foods and Cargill Inc. are among Memphis Meats' investors. There's some confusion over how meat grown by culturing animal cells will be regulated. The U.S. Department of Agriculture oversees meat inspections, while the Food and Drug Administration oversees other aspects of food safety, including the "standards of identity" that spell out what ingredients can go into products with specific names. The FDA — which in the past has called out Kraft's use of the term "pasteurized process cheese food" — plans to hold a public meeting to discuss "cultured" meat next month. In the meantime, all sides are scrambling to frame the issue in their own words. The Good Food Institute, an advocacy and lobbying group for meat alternatives, is embracing "clean meat," which channels the positive connotations of "clean energy." Other options it tested: "Meat 2.0," ''Safe Meat" and "Pure Meat." "Green Meat" was dismissed early on. "Nobody wants to eat green meat," said Bruce Friedrich, co-founder of the Good Food Institute. The National Cattlemen's Beef Association is fighting to defend what it sees as its linguistic turf. "Our marching orders were to protect beef nomenclature," says Beck. The cattlemen's group prefers less appetizing terms such as "in vitro meat," ''synthetic meat" or even "meat byproduct" for meat grown through cultured cells. For meat alternatives more broadly, it likes "fake meat." The U.S. Cattlemen's Association, a smaller group, also petitioned the USDA in February to enforce that "beef" and "meat" only be used for animals "born, raised and harvested in the traditional manner." And in October, the former head of the U.S. Farmers & Ranchers Alliance considered a way to possibly halt the use of "clean meat" after hearing the term. "You will see that we left the conference and immediately investigated the term 'Clean Meat' from a trademark perspective," wrote Randy Krotz, then-CEO of the group, according to an email obtained through a public records request by Property of the People, which advocates for government transparency. Krotz noted that another party had already applied for the trademark, but said the alliance was able to claim the Twitter handle "@clean_meat." That account does not show any activity. Anne Curzan, a professor of English at the University of Michigan, says the term "clean meat" highlights the positive and pushes into the background aspects that may make people uncomfortable. "It is smart branding to try to keep the product from being associated with 'frankenfood'," Curzan says. It's just the latest front in the war of words in food. Last year, the dairy industry revived its quest to abolish terms like "soy milk" and "almond milk," saying that milk is defined as being obtained from a cow. That came after a vegan spread provoked the ire of the Association for Dressings and Sauces, of which Hellmann's is a member, by calling itself "Just Mayo." Even grains aren't immune from controversy. With cauliflower "rice" becoming popular with low-carb eaters, the rice industry is punching back with its own term for chopped-up vegetable substitutes: "rice pretenders ."

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Technology

Kubota to Launch Japan's 1st Autonomous Combine Harvester in Dec.

Farm equipment manufacturer Kubota Corp. said Friday it will roll out an autonomous combine harvester in December, becoming the first to introduce such a farm machine in Japan. Utilizing an advanced global positioning system, the "Agri Robo combine" can autonomously follow a preset, most efficient route through the field and harvest rice. It can also automatically get to a set destination to unload rice husks before its hopper becomes full, according Kubota. Introduction of the combine harvester comes after the autonomous tractor that the company began selling on a trial basis last year. The smart combine harvester equipped with GPS system is priced around 20 million yen ($180,000). Given Japan's aging and declining population of farmers, self-driving farm machinery is expected to make the agriculture sector more efficient. Kubota said it aims to improve the quality of agricultural produce and cut costs through the automation of farming. A driver still needs to be onboard to monitor and command the robotic combine during some operations. Unloading of husks requires manual labor as well.

Beef. It's What's For Dinner. Debuts Virtual Reality Ranch Tours at Food & Wine Classic in Aspen

DENVER- In a first for the FOOD & WINE Classic in Aspen, Beef. It's What's For Dinner. will offer attendees an on-site virtual reality ranching experience. Through this technology, attendees will have an opportunity to virtually visit a farm or ranch where they can explore how cattle are raised to produce high-quality beef. Following the FOOD & WINE Classic, the 360-degree videos will be available to public to provide consumers with an in-depth look at cattle farming and ranching. In addition to debuting virtual reality videos, as the exclusive protein sponsor of the 2018 FOOD & WINE Classic, the Beef Checkoff funded Beef. It's What's For Dinner. will showcase all things beef at the event. Attendees will have an opportunity to talk with ranchers about what it's like to raise cattle and produce beef, watch a beef cutting demonstration by a meat scientist, and sample on-trend beef recipes. "We know people want to learn more about where their food comes from, but not everyone can visit a farm or ranch," said Alisa Harrison, senior vice president, Global Marketing and Research for the National Cattlemen's Beef Association, a contractor to the Beef Checkoff. "Our new 360-degree videos offer an opportunity to learn more about how cattle are raised and become immersed in ranching experiences from anywhere at any time." The three 360-degree videos transport the viewer to a ranch to experience some of the different ways cattle are raised. -- Triple U Ranch - A look around Triple U Ranch shows a family-owned diversified farm and ranch in Iowa where they have a cow-calf operation, a small feedyard, and grow crops to feed to their cattle. The ranch was started in the 1940's and has been in the family and had cattle on it ever since. Jessica Utesch Wilson, who manages the mama cow and calf part of the ranch, was raised there and is raising her kids on the land. -- Bracket Ranch - A peek into the Brackett family's life at Brackett Ranch on the Oregon and Idaho border shows unparalleled beauty. The Bracketts and their four kids raise cows and calves on private and federal public lands. By ranching on public lands, the Brackett family is helping preserve water and plants, controlling fires, and protecting wildlife habitat. -- Easterday Ranches - The tour of Easterday ranches takes you to a state of the art feedyard in Washington with more than 70,000 head of cattle and thousands of acres of onions, potatoes, corn and wheat where they take pride in caring for their cattle and producing lean beef in the most efficient and sustainable way possible. The Easterday family has been in the Columbia River basin for four generations. "We are excited to be part of the FOOD & WINE Classic in Aspen," added Harrison. "Cattle farmers and ranchers care deeply about the beef they produce, and it is an honor to showcase their hard work and highlight beef, from pasture to plate, at one of the world's premier food and wine festivals." For a look at all things beef including the 360-degree videos, information on cuts and cookery, a robust collection of beef recipes, and the video that relaunched the Beef. It's What's For Dinner. brand, visit BeefItsWhatsForDinner.com.

USDA’s Farmers.gov Receives $10 Million in Funding for Development

WASHINGTON-Thursday the Technology Modernization Fund Board (Board) awarded funding to support the development of USDA’s Farmers.gov customer experience portal, which helps better connect America’s farmers, ranchers, conservationists, and private foresters with vital USDA resources and programs. The Board is chaired by the Federal Chief Information Officer for the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). Following the funding announcement from OMB, USDA Under Secretary for Farm Production and Conservation Bill Northey said, “Farmers.gov will provide a user-friendly portal for connecting agricultural producers to the USDA services and programs they need. This new resource also will reduce the time farmers need to take away from their fields today to fill out paperwork. We are very pleased that Farmers.gov is receiving funding to continue its development so USDA can improve the way we deliver services to our customers.” Farmers.gov is mobile device-friendly and can identify for farmers the most convenient USDA office locations. Additional functions will be added to the site, including an interactive calendar, an online appointment feature, digital forms, and a business data dashboard. Additionally, when the 2018 Farm Bill is signed into law, there will be plain language program descriptions and a tool to determine eligibility. To learn about the Farmers.gov vision, USDA’s farmer-centered design principles, and roadmap for the website, visit the Farmers.gov playbook at www.farmers.gov/playbook.

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Ag Policy

Nebraska Motor Fuels Tax Rate to Drop July 1

LINCOLN, Neb. (AP) — Nebraska motorists could soon pay less to the state at gas pumps. The Department of Revenue announced Wednesday that the state motor fuels tax will drop fourth-tenths of a cent on July 1, to 28 cents per gallon (nearly 4 liters) from 28.4 cents. The fuels tax is composed of a wholesale, variable and fixed tax. The wholesale is based on the wholesale price of fuel. That tax will rise to 9.7 cents from 8.7 cents. The variable tax is based on legislative appropriations for transportation. That rate will drop to 3.5 cents from 4.9 cents. The fixed tax will remain unchanged at 14.8 cents per gallon. The new rate runs through Dec. 31.

$20,000 Agricultural Safety Grants Offered by National Children’s Center

Proposals are now being accepted by the National Children’s Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety for grants up to $20,000 to support small-scale projects and pilot studies that address prevention of childhood agricultural disease and injury. Application deadline is August 20, 2018. Highest priority will be given to projects that: Utilize the www.AgInjuryNews.org website; Incorporate the Agricultural Youth Work Guidelines (www.CultivateSafety.org/family-farms), and/or; Focus on special populations (e.g., workers’ children, Anabaptists, African Americans, Native Americans). Since 2002, 56 projects have been funded. For information on eligibility, how to improve your chances of being funded, submitting a proposal and frequently asked questions, go to www.marshfieldresearch.org/nccrahs/mini-grants. Or contact Marsha Salzwedel, salzwedel.marsha@marshfieldresearch.org; 715-389-5226 or 1-800-662-6900 option 8.

(Video) Morning Agriculture News Update - June 20, 2018

Susan Littlefield reports on the latest in agriculture news. Story 1: The U.S. House faces a Friday deadline to re-vote on the current farm bill proposal. Story 2: Farm Credit Outlook Shows Prices for Grains to Strengthen Story 3: Secretary Perdue Comments on Canada Dairy Issue Watch: Additional Agriculture Feature Stories

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Markets

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KNEB KTIC KAWL KXSP - Omaha KSID - Sidney KCSR - Chadron KNCY - Nebraska City KWBE - Beatrice/Fairbury