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VIDEO: Nebraska State Fair-abration! - Friday Five (8/23/19)

The 150th Nebraska State Fair kicked off Friday, August 23 in Grand Island. There are dozens of activities to experience, so Bryce and Alex highlight five agriculture-related activities you won't want to miss! Activities include the 25,000 square-foot Raising Nebraska exhibit, over 35 food vendor...

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VIDEO: Nebraska State Fair-abration! - Friday Five (8/23/19)

The 150th Nebraska State Fair kicked off Friday, August 23 in Grand Island. There are dozens of activities to experience, so Bryce and Alex highlight five agriculture-related activities you won't want to miss! Activities include the 25,000 square-foot Raising Nebraska exhibit, over 35 food vendor...

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Cattle On Feed Report August *AUDIO*

 Cattle and calves on feed for the slaughter market in the United States for feedlots with capacity of 1,000 or more head totaled 11.1 million head on August 1, 2019. The inventory was slightly above August 1, 2018. This is the highest August 1 inventory since the series began in 1996, USDA reporte...

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Rural Development Saves Nebraskans Energy Dollars

 LINCOLN, NEB. Aug. 23, 2019 – Nebraska Rural Development State Director Karl Elmshaeuser announces that the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has awarded $203,493in Nebraska to reduce energy costs for agricultural producers and rural small businesses.    “The energy projects funded ...

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NDA announces Ft. Laramie Canal crop loss insurable

On Aug. 23, Governor Pete Ricketts and Nebraska Department of Agriculture (NDA) Director Steve Wellman thanked US Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue and the Risk Management Agency for the determination of an insurable event for those affected by the collapse of an irrigation tunnel near Fort Lara...

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Northeast Community College fundraising for new ag facility

NORFOLK, Neb. (AP) — Northeast Community College is raising money to build new agriculture facilities on the college's Norfolk campus. Officials said Thursday what will become the Agriculture and Water Center of Excellence will give students an opportunity to learn in state-of-the-art facilitie...

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Crops

VIDEO: Nebraska State Fair-abration! - Friday Five (8/23/19)

The 150th Nebraska State Fair kicked off Friday, August 23 in Grand Island. There are dozens of activities to experience, so Bryce and Alex highlight five agriculture-related activities you won't want to miss! Activities include the 25,000 square-foot Raising Nebraska exhibit, over 35 food vendors and the Livestock Champion Selection and Parade of Supreme Breeding Champions Livestream available at ruralradio.com. STORIES:  5) Raising Nebraska 4) Crop of the Year: Soybeans 3) Fair Food Fanatic 2) Birthing, Milking and Shearing 1) Watch the Champion Shows Live!

Vietnamese Market Continues Demand Growth Despite ASF Challenges

There are no rearview mirrors on the motorbikes in Ho Chi Minh City, as the saying goes, implying the Vietnamese people never look backward, but stay focused on the future. That can-do, progressive attitude has established Vietnam as one of the fastest growing feed markets in the world with attendant increases in demand for meat, milk and eggs from a middle class growing in number and influence. An on-the-ground presence is extremely important in Vietnam, where government policies and market situations can change quickly. Caleb Wurth, U.S. Grains Council (USGC) assistant director for Southeast Asia, recently spent three weeks traveling throughout the country to assess the impact of African Swine Fever (ASF) virus on local swine production and overall feed demand for corn and dried distiller’s grains with solubles (DDGS) as well as inform the Council’s overall strategic approach. Wurth discovered Vietnamese producers are wasting no time in retooling their operations as the virus has affected a large portion of their swine herds. He observed farmers culling herd and clearing barns to make them ready for layers, broilers or ducks in the same space the next week. Farmers are also expanding into aquaculture - in both freshwater ponds in the delta region and offshore in cages along the coast. “The extensive losses in swine production are being partially offset by increases in poultry and off-shore cage aquaculture,” Wurth said. “In response, the Council has begun working with local feed mills and DDGS importers to assist farms devastated by ASF to switch to poultry, layer or duck farming rather than give up meat production altogether.” If an effective vaccine is discovered, however, the Council expects to see farmers revert to a similar pre-ASF protein mix, reinforcing the need to maintain both long-term efforts - like working to increase DDGS inclusion rates - and frontier market work - including hiring a full-time aquaculture specialist for the region through funding from the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Trade Promotion (USDA’s ATP) program. Both pieces are necessary to successfully pivot alongside animal industries in Vietnam and throughout Southeast Asia. “Vietnam is just one of the markets in Southeast Asia with tremendous potential,” Wurth said. “As programming pivots to address shifting market demands, the Council will continue to leverage the success of its programs, people and partnerships to cultivate significant sales of U.S. feed grains, ethanol and co-products.” In less than a decade, Vietnam has grown from a top 10 to a top three corn importer in the world. The country is a significant importer of both U.S. corn and DDGS with additional future potential for U.S. sorghum. That same rising middle class is also creating additional demand for ethanol, aided by a nationwide E5 blend mandate expected to grow to E10. These factors combine to make Vietnam a focus of the Council’s work to capture increasing demand for feed grains and ethanol export volumes for U.S. farmers and agribusinesses in Southeast Asia.

China buys U.S. soybeans after declaring ban on American farm goods

CHICAGO, Aug 22 (Reuters) - China snapped up a small volume of U.S. soybeans last week after pledging to halt purchases of American farm products due to the escalating trade war between Washington and Beijing, U.S. Department of Agriculture data showed on Thursday. The world’s largest soybean importer struck deals from Aug. 9 to 15 to buy 9,589 tonnes for delivery in the current marketing year and 66,000 tonnes, approximately one cargo, for the next year, the data showed. China’s Commerce Ministry said on Aug. 5 that Chinese companies stopped buying U.S. farm products in the latest escalation of the trade war between the world’s two largest economies. “You do have some buying going on,” said Arlan Suderman, chief commodities economist for INTL FCStone. “It’s a little bit of a surprise.” China last year imposed retaliatory tariffs that remain in place on imports of U.S. farm products including soybeans and pork. The duties have slashed exports of U.S. crops and prompted the Trump administration to compensate American farmers for losses over two years with as much as $28 billion. China said on Thursday it hopes the United States will stop a plan to impose new tariffs, adding that any new duties would lead to a further escalation. China has largely turned to South America for soybeans since the trade war began last year. U.S. soybean sales to China in 2018 dropped 74% from the previous year. “Compared to what they used to buy, they essentially have halted - but some have gotten through,” Suderman said. The sales of 9,589 tonnes for delivery in the current marketing year will probably be rolled ahead to be delivered in the next year, which begins on Sept. 1, said Don Roose, president of Iowa-based broker U.S. Commodities. The cargo sold for delivery in the next marketing year could have been in the works before Beijing said Chinese companies would suspend purchases of U.S. farm goods, said Terry Reilly, senior commodity analyst for Futures International. “The government may have just given the green light to say, ‘Let this one go through,’” Reilly said. “One cargo is not going to change the fact that they’re not buying millions of tons of soybeans.” (Reporting by Tom Polansek Editing by Marguerita Choy)

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Livestock

Cattle On Feed Report August *AUDIO*

 Cattle and calves on feed for the slaughter market in the United States for feedlots with capacity of 1,000 or more head totaled 11.1 million head on August 1, 2019. The inventory was slightly above August 1, 2018. This is the highest August 1 inventory since the series began in 1996, USDA reported on Friday. Placements in feedlots during July totaled 1.71 million head, 2% below 2018. Net placements were 1.63 million head. During July, placements of cattle and calves weighing less than 600 pounds were 360,000 head, 600-699 pounds were 260,000 head, 700-799 pounds were 410,000 head, 800-899 pounds were 385,000 head, 900-999 pounds were 200,000 head, and 1,000 pounds and greater were 90,000 head. Marketings of fed cattle during July totaled 2.00 million head, 7% above 2018. Other disappearance totaled 71,000 head during July, 13% above 2018. ** Jerry Stowell, Country Futures, breaks down the report here: https://c1.futuripost.com/krvnam/playlist/cattle-on-feed-august-report-placements-below-100-7485.html  The report is available at https://www.nass.usda.gov/…. USDA Actual Average Estimate Range On Feed August 1 100.0% 100.7% 100.5-102.0% Placed in July 98.0% 100.0% 98.6-108.5% Marketed in July 107.0% 106.8% 106.1-107.6%

Secure Beef Supply, Anaplasmosis Discussed At Dorrance Field Day

Benefits of a Secure Beef Supply (SBS) Plan, managing anaplasmosis in cowherds and locust tree/yucca shrub control were among the topics discussed at the final KLA/Kansas State University Ranch Management Field Day. Nearly 100 ranchers attended the August 22 event hosted by the Lyman Nuss family near Dorrance. Kansas Department of Agriculture Animal health Planner Emily Voris explained how producers implementing a SBS Plan on their operations can help sustain the economic viability of the industry during disease outbreak. A Secure Beef Supply Plan is a comprehensive set of biosecurity protocols that can be an efficient and effective response tool to minimize disease spread in the event of an outbreak, like foot-and-mouth. Plans are operation-specific and should encompass biosecurity measures for all inputs and outputs, she said, including employees, vehicles, feed, incoming/outgoing livestock and manure. For more information, visit www.securebeef.org. K-State veterinarian Hans Coetzee helped ranchers learn how to identify anaplasmosis in cattle, a disease spread through injection needles, flies and ticks and is estimated to cost the industry $300 million annually. Clinical signs include yellow mucus membranes, fever, anorexia, constipation, anemia, abortion and ataxia. There are multiple control methods, he said, including vaccination use and medicated mineral, but advised ranchers to consult a veterinarian to determine the best management strategy for their operation. Also during the field day, K-State Range Scientist Keith Harmoney explained how to reduce honey locust trees using an aminopyralid/2,4-D application. In addition, he advised to treat yucca shrubs with a triclopyr/diesel mix for individual control or metsulfuron methyl/2, 4-D for dense populations. Old World bluestem management strategies and a CattleTrace update rounded out the sessions. More coverage of the CattleTrace pilot project will appear in the November/December Kansas Stockman magazine. Bayer Animal Health and the Farm Credit Associations of Kansas sponsored the field day.

Anthrax Found in Livestock in ND, TX

OMAHA (DTN) -- Anthrax, a disease which can affect both livestock and humans, continues to be an issue in different places across the country this growing season. At least two states have reported livestock cases in recent weeks. Anthrax was reported in a herd of cattle in western North Dakota, according to a North Dakota Department of Agriculture press release from Aug. 12. This is the first case of anthrax this year in the state. "Anthrax has been confirmed in a group of cows in a pasture in east Billings County," said North Dakota Agriculture Commissioner Doug Goehring. The case was confirmed by the North Dakota State University Diagnostic Laboratory based on blood and tissue samples submitted by a local veterinarian in the area. PROTECT LIVESTOCK The case is a reminder to livestock producers in the state to take action to protect their animals from the disease, especially those in areas with a past history of the disease, according to North Dakota State Veterinarian Dr. Susan Keller. "Producers in past known affected areas and counties should consult with their veterinarians to make sure the vaccination schedule for their animals is current," Keller said. A few cases are reported in the state almost every year. In 2005, more than 500 confirmed animal deaths were reported, with total losses estimated at more than 1,000 head. The animals included cattle, bison, horses, sheep, llamas and farmed deer and elk. North Dakota reported no cases of anthrax in 2016 and 2018 and just one case in 2017, according to the press release. TEXAS CASE A new case of anthrax was reported in the Aug. 13 Texas Anthrax Situational Update report from the Texas Animal Health Commission (TAHC). The weekly report from TAHC will be discontinued unless anthrax is confirmed in a new county or the agency sees a sizable increase in cases, according to the report. Anthrax was detected on one new premise in south-central Crockett County and in one new premise in northwest Sutton County since the previous report on Aug. 6. The disease has previously been confirmed in both counties this year. According to the report, 20 premises in five Texas counties have had animals confirmed with anthrax. Animals affected include antelope, goats, horses, deer and cattle. "It is common to see an increase in anthrax cases after periods of wet, cool, weather, followed by hot, dry conditions," the report stated. "During these conditions, animals ingest the anthrax bacteria when they consume contaminated grass and hay, or inhale the spores. Outbreaks usually end when the cooler weather arrives." Livestock owners are encouraged to consult with a local veterinarian and should also consider vaccinating livestock in areas were anthrax is historically found, according to the report. This includes Crockett, Uvalde, Val Verde, Sutton, Edwards, Kinney and Maverick counties, all located near the U.S.-Mexican border. CAUSED BY A BACTERIA Anthrax is a disease cause by a bacteria known as Bacillus anthracis, according to a North Dakota State University Extension press release (https://www.ag.ndsu.edu/…. This bacteria has a special survival mechanism called spore formation, which allows the bacteria to produce very hardy spores with a high survival rate. These spores can survive for years under the right conditions. When these spores come into contact with susceptible cattle, they can "hatch" and infect the animals, resulting in disease and death. Often the only initial signs of anthrax infection is finding dead cattle, according to Gerald Stokka, NDSU Extension veterinarian. "If the diagnosis of anthrax is suspected and confirmed by your veterinarian, then vaccination needs to be implemented as quickly as possible," Stokka stated. The commercial vaccine available is a live attenuated (non-disease causing) spore vaccine. The dose is 1 cubic centimeter (cc) administered subcutaneously in the neck region. All adult cattle and calves should be administered the vaccine, and treatment with antibiotics should be withheld because it may interfere with the immune response, said the news release. However, when faced with an outbreak situation, administering an antibiotic and a vaccine concurrently has been effective. Stokka said producers should consult with a local veterinarian for a recommendation. "Consider removing all cattle from the pasture where anthrax deaths are suspected because spores can infect the remaining animals," he said. Anthrax also carries a risk to humans so those handling carcasses should do so with care and avoid disturbing the carcass. The recommended method of disposal is to place the animal in a trench dug in the immediate area of the death, then burn the carcass and soil where the carcass was found. MORE ON ANTHRAX AND LIVESTOCK NDSU has more information about anthrax here. Information about anthrax and livestock can also be found from New Mexico State University here.

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Technology

Kansas Corn Farmers Featured in STEM Education Book

Kansas Corn has published a new educational book titled, “We Grow Corn—Raising corn on a Kansas family farm”. The book, with an accompanying video series, will be an important component of the Kansas Corn STEM program, which provides STEM-based lessons and classroom materials to K-12 teachers.  In the 2018-19 school year, Kansas Corn STEM reached over 1,300 teachers, and more than 50,000 students. The addition of the “We Grow Corn” book and videos will expand the program’s impact on STEM learning in Kansas schools. Kansas Corn collaborated with northeast Kansas corn farmers Brad and Danyelle McCauley and their four children to show students how corn is grown. The book follows the McCauley family farm through the year with photographs, information and fun facts. Readers will also learn about irrigated corn on a page featuring the Steve Rome family farm in southwest Kansas. Eight online videos featuring Brad McCauley and Steve Rome accompany the book to give students a deeper look into farming. An online teacher resource page is also available. Farmers played a key role in the project, according to Kansas Corn Director of Education Sharon Thielen, PhD, who authored the book and led the project. “Farmers were involved in every step of creating this book and video series. We especially appreciate the help of the McCauley and Rome farm families who brought this project to life. Our goal was to make this an informative book about corn farming in Kansas while providing STEM learning opportunities,” Thielen said. “Working with Manhattan-based photographer and videographer Ray Martinez, we were able to capture stunning images that authentically depict a year on Kansas corn farms.” McCauley said his family participated in the project to support STEM education in Kansas schools. “This project was important to our family because it supports education in our schools by showing how we grow corn on our family farm,” Brad McCauley said. “Science and technology play a big role in growing corn and other crops in Kansas. That’s why corn farmers support this effort to support STEM learning in our Kansas classrooms.” The We Grow Corn book and video series is part of a larger offering of lessons and material for K-12 teachers. The hands-on lessons range from sprouting corn seeds and understanding soil and water needs for crops to making corn-based plastics and ethanol in challenging high school lab experiments. The book is available to Kansas teachers and a book will also be included in each teacher kit sent out this year through the Kansas Corn STEM program. Teachers can order lessons and materials for their grade level online at kansascornstem.com. A teacher guide, online access to the book, videos and photos are available at wegrowcorn.com The Kansas Corn STEM program is led by Kansas Corn staff and teachers across the state who write lessons and labs for use in Kansas classrooms. The program received national recognition with the “Reaching for Excellence” award from the National Corn Growers Association earlier this year. Teachers can learn more about Kansas Corn’s education program at kansascornstem.com and access online materials for the book and videos at wegrowcorn.com

NCGA Voices Support for USDA Proposed Rule on Biotech Regulation, Offers Suggestions for Improvement

The National Corn Growers Association today submitted comments to the U.S. Department of Agriculture on the Proposed Rule regarding Movement of Certain Genetically Engineered Organisms. The submission voiced support for the proposed rule while also offering several suggestions that would strengthen the final rule. The proposed rule marks the first comprehensive revision of USDA’s regulations since they were established in 1987. Corn farmers have a strong interest in the availability of new technologies to enhance the sustainability, productivity and competitiveness of U.S. agriculture. Agriculture biotechnology and next generation breeding techniques allow growers to increase yields while decreasing inputs. Meeting demand, improving processes and minimizing environmental impacts are what make modern corn production a dynamic industry. The proposed rule, in large part, demonstrates an underlying agreement with the basis of NCGA’s stance and strives to create a more efficient regulatory process allowing growers greater access to new products. NCGA praised USDA’s intention to focus on the plant pest risk of each product, instead of the method used to create it.  NCGA also thanked USDA for its proposal to only review plant-trait-mechanisms of action (MOA) requiring oversight once, instead of each time that MOA is used in combination with other traits, as is the requirement now. The proposed rule indicates a path moving forward appropriate for the advancements in plant breeding innovation while ensuring a responsible degree of oversight. To further build upon this foundation in the rule, NCGA requested explicit and formal language be added to ensure this system functions in a timely and reliable manner that adds no additional barriers for previously approved plant-trait mechanisms. The comments submitted urged the USDA to coordinate with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Food and Drug Administration broadly on the regulation of ag biotechnology to continue streamlining the process and avoiding unnecessary duplications that delayed the tools farmers need to meet today’s needs. NCGA referenced the June 11, 2019 Executive Order, Modernizing the Regulatory Framework for Agricultural Biotechnology Products, which asks the three regulatory agencies to identify ways to streamline regulatory processes, when making this request. To view the full comments as submitted, click here.

Stalk-Worn Sensor to Measure Crops' Water Use

Lincoln, Nebraska, July 31, 2019 — Wearable technology will soon move from wrist to stalk, swapping measures of blood flow and respiration for sap flow and transpiration. Their design won’t have anyone confusing growing season with fashion season, but the University of Nebraska–Lincoln’s James Schnable and Iowa State University colleagues are developing a Fitbit-like sensor to be worn by corn and other thick-stemmed crops. Funded by a Breakthrough Technologies award from the National Science Foundation, the researchers are pursuing an elusive goal: measuring rates of sap flow in real time, actual fields and changing weather conditions. Because sap flow indicates how much water a plant is using vs. conserving, measuring it with hourly or minute-by-minute precision would help researchers better understand how crops are responding to drought conditions. That, in turn, would allow researchers to compare the drought resistance of different genetic lines with greater speed and accuracy, Schnable said, leading to more water-efficient hybrids that can tolerate ever-harsher climates from Nebraska to Nigeria. [caption id="attachment_398905" align="alignnone" width="300"] By measuring the water use of plants on an hourly or even minute-by-minute basis, Nebraska's James Schnable and colleagues hope to better understand and eventually improve how crops respond to drought. (Craig Chandler/University Communication)[/caption] “There are different strategies plants can take and different strategies plant breeders can pursue depending on their goal, the environment they’re breeding for and the crop they’re working on,” said Schnable, associate professor of agronomy and horticulture. “All of these, though, do require (that) you actually be able to look at how much water the plant is using, not over just an entire growing season but really on a day-by-day or hour-by-hour basis.” Understanding water use is especially important, Schnable said, given that a plant’s ability to resist drought competes with its ability to produce food. When a plant opens the tiny pores in its leaves to welcome the carbon dioxide essential for photosynthesis — and eventually, food — some of its water escapes through those same pores, making it more susceptible to drought. Crops bred for higher yields invite in even more carbon dioxide, giving water more opportunities to depart. Managing that physiological tug-of-war — or even finding ways to lengthen the rope at both ends — will become more critical by 2050, when the world will likely need to feed an additional 2 billion people while accounting for more-sporadic rainfall. As of now, crop breeders usually assess new genetic lines by planting a series of trials under drought conditions, measuring the yields and comparing those yields to what’s produced in a water-rich environment, Schnable said. The smaller the difference in yield, the better. “So they’re (currently) taking a lot of different things that could all feed into drought tolerance — they’re all lumped together — and they get this one output value, which is: What’s the final yield,” Schnable said. The research team — which also includes Schnable’s father, Patrick, at Iowa State — instead wants to pinpoint the conditions under which different crop varieties begin or stop conserving water, potentially helping customize varieties to different climates. Pairing those observations with genetic analyses of the varieties could also offer more detailed information about the practical influence of various genes in the field, guiding modification efforts in the lab. “The more we can actually measure some of those (individual factors) in the field and look at the differences between varieties, the more we can make precise judgments about how two different lines with the same level of drought tolerance got there,” Schnable said. “You could separate those (different factors) out and then breed for those individual factors separately. “Think of it like this: You can compare two cars by how fast they go or, once you can start to pull apart (and) look at different parts of the engine, figure out how each part of the engine works well or poorly, then maybe start to combine the best of different engines together. But you can only do that if you can measure the performance of different parts separately instead of looking at just the final speed.” POOR SAP? The team’s project qualified for the Breakthrough Technologies program — which the National Science Foundation developed for “high-risk, high-reward” pursuits — in part because no one has managed to develop a sensor that can monitor sap flow over a full growing season in the field. But Iowa State’s Liang Dong has crafted a design, which consists of sophisticated technology packed into a small but flexible package, that the team hopes will prove equal to some of the most stubborn challenges. To gauge the rate of sap flow, the bracelet-like device will administer small amounts of heat to the stem it fits around. Tiny sensors above and below the micro-heater will then record the amount of heat that passes by, effectively measuring how quickly the sap is carrying the heat away — and, by association, how fast the sap is flowing. A combination of nanoscopic structures and fibers within the device should help insulate the sensors, preventing a loss of heat that could otherwise invalidate their readings. Its flexibility comes by way of an elastic band that can stretch to accommodate the growth of corn stalks or other crop stems, including those of soybean and sorghum, that can widen substantially within weeks. The elasticity also serves another purpose: allowing the device to monitor a stem’s diameter, which factors into the equations that describe how fast the heat is traveling and sap is flowing. “The power of the sensors is (that) we can measure something that has not been practical to measure before, which is how much water the plant is using on a very fine resolution,” Schnable said. “The challenge is (that) if you design a tool to measure something that hasn't been measured before, how do you know if you're getting it right or not?” The answer? Compare the sensor data against a known quantity — in this case, finely calibrated technology at Nebraska’s Greenhouse Innovation Center. There, a series of conveyor belts, hyperspectral cameras and scales can detect faint changes in the water weight of individual plants that either do or don’t sport the new sensors. Then, it’s essentially just a matter of weighing one set of measurements against the other, Schnable said. “That way we can tell if we’re producing useful data or gibberish,” he said. It also captures what most excites him, on a personal level, about the project. “My favorite collaborations are those where I'm working with people who have completely different skill sets than mine,” Schnable said. “Dr. Dong came out of the biomedical field, which is why he knows how to build wearable sensors to address all sorts of different questions and problems. We're coming at the same problem from completely different backgrounds and completely different motivations. "Just getting to have those conversations and learn about topics I never would have been exposed to in any sort of a normal plant science job is really fun.”

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Ag Policy

Soy Groups Seek Meeting with Trump on Waivers

The National Biodiesel Board and American Soybean Association have requested a meeting with President Donald Trump to discuss small refinery exemptions. In a letter to the President, NBB CEO Donnell Rehagen and ASA President Davie Stephens detail the damage the waivers have dealt the biofuels industry and farmers. The letter, noting the conditions in farm country, says that while many fear an economic recession within the next year, farmers are “already facing a severe economic downturn.” The two groups conclude the letter with a request to meet with the President: "We would appreciate an opportunity to discuss how the administration can repair the uncertainty.” President Trump held a meeting earlier this week to find ways to smooth over farmer anger, specifically related to the small refinery waivers. Biodiesel and ethanol groups start with asking for a reallocation of waived volumes, now estimated at more than four billion gallons. More than 15 ethanol plants have shut down, blaming the demand destruction caused by the waivers.

Canada-China Relations Strain over Politics, Trade

While the U.S. continues its trade war negotiations with China, Canada's relations with China are straining, as well. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says Canada' won't back down' to various disputes with China. Meanwhile, China, which has made a similar warning to the U.S., tells Canada comments regarding the unrest in Hong Kong are not welcome. Specifically, China says, "Hong Kong affairs are purely China's internal affairs." China hopes Canada can "reflect on its wrongdoing," regarding Hong Kong and other issues, including those that now impact agricultural trade. China has detained two Canadian citizens and halted imports of canola seed and meat products from Canada. The move was in response to Vancouver police detaining a senior Huawei executive on a U.S. arrest warrant in December. China imported 4.8 million metric tons of Canadian canola in 2018, and 1.1 million metric tons of canola oil, supporting more than 16,000 Canadian jobs. China is typically the largest market for Canadian canola, and Canada is the world's largest producer of canola.

Northeast Community College fundraising for new ag facility

NORFOLK, Neb. (AP) — Northeast Community College is raising money to build new agriculture facilities on the college's Norfolk campus. Officials said Thursday what will become the Agriculture and Water Center of Excellence will give students an opportunity to learn in state-of-the-art facilities. The Acklie Charitable Foundation announced a $5 million lead gift for the $23 million project. Officials hope to begin construction in spring 2020.

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Markets

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