class="home blog group-blog masthead-fixed list-view full-width grid wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-5.5.2 vc_responsive"
Rural Radio Network | Affiliates Rural Radio Network site

Rural Radio Network

30 Years of Data on Optimum Plant Density and Yield gains for Corn Recognized in Scientific Reports

DES MOINES, Iowa – A collaboration between Kansas State University and DuPont Pioneer Agronomy analyzing 30 years of corn plant population responses shows that as agronomic optimum plant density increased, the range for maximizing yields also widened. DuPont Pioneer has collected data on corn ...

Read More
story slider pointer

30 Years of Data on Optimum Plant Density and Yield gains for Corn Recognized in Scientific Reports

DES MOINES, Iowa – A collaboration between Kansas State University and DuPont Pioneer Agronomy analyzing 30 years of corn plant population responses shows that as agronomic optimum plant density increased, the range for maximizing yields also widened. DuPont Pioneer has collected data on corn ...

Read More

Cattle on Feed Cattle Inventory *AUDIO*

OMAHA  -- Cattle and calves on feed for the slaughter market in the United States for feedlots with capacity of 1,000 or more head totaled 11.3 million head on July 1, 2018, USDA reported on Friday. The inventory was 4 percent above July 1, 2017. This is the highest July 1 inventory since the serie...

Read More

(Video) Top Agriculture News -- Friday Five

This week's edition of Friday Five, presented by the Nebraska Corn Board, is a review of five headline stories in agriculture from the past week. STORIES: 5) Unexpected Tornadoes in Iowa 4) Who Will Regulate Fake Meat? 3) Corn Congress, Deb Gangwish Elected to NCGA Corn Board 2) H...

Read More

Nebraska Farmer Sues Over Crop Damage From Herbicide

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — A Nebraska farmer has sued herbicide manufacturers, saying his neighbors' use of the company products damaged his soybean crop last summer. The Lincoln Journal Star reports that Shane Greckel filed the federal lawsuit last week against Monsanto and other companies whose produ...

Read More

Limousin Junior National Shows Continue in Denver

The Limousin enthusiasm continued Wednesday, July 18 in Denver, Colorado for the 2018 National Junior Limousin Show & Congress. In this second day of showing, 130 Limousin and Lim-Flex animals were paraded in front of Dr. Scott Schaake of Westmoreland, Kan., for their appraisal. Grand champio...

Read More

Crops

30 Years of Data on Optimum Plant Density and Yield gains for Corn Recognized in Scientific Reports

DES MOINES, Iowa – A collaboration between Kansas State University and DuPont Pioneer Agronomy analyzing 30 years of corn plant population responses shows that as agronomic optimum plant density increased, the range for maximizing yields also widened. DuPont Pioneer has collected data on corn plant population responses and yield gains to provide better information on hybrids. From 1987 to 2015, nearly 200,000 yield and plant population data points were collected from more than 40 locations throughout North America. In collaboration with Pioneer, the data was analyzed by Ignacio Ciampitti, an associate professor in crop production and cropping systems at Kansas State University, and his team. Recently, the study was published in Scientific Reports and recognized for its discovery of trends in optimum plant density and yield gains. Analysis of 30 years of corn plant population responses shows that as agronomic optimum plant density increased, the range for maximizing corn yields also widened. This means modern hybrids benefit from increased plant populations without the previous instability that resulted from higher populations. Study findings show a 53-bushel-per-acre yield increase. "It used to be that we were primarily achieving yield gains by improving the plant density tolerance, but there is evidence from this and other recent studies that we are seeing yield per plant increasing," said Paul Carter, DuPont Pioneer agronomy manager. Key findings The average agronomic optimum plant density across environments and hybrids increased from 30,500 plants per acre from 1987 to 1991 to 37,900 plants per acre from 2012 to 2016. During the first five years, the range of optimal agronomic plant density was narrow but increased over time. "This indicates that modern hybrids not only need more plants in order to push for higher yields, but also they are showing a stability that the old hybrids did not. For farmers, that means they have some leverage," Ciampitti said. "It's really unique to have this amount of data, from multiple sites, across that many years in order to track plant density and its relationship to corn yields." Over the duration of the study, average corn yield over all locations at the agronomic optimum plant density increased from 135 bushels per acre in 1987 to 188 bushels per acre in 2015, representing an overall yield gain of 53 bushels per acre. As the agronomic optimum plant density increased, the range for maximizing corn yields also widened. New elite hybrids are credited for these increases in yield per plant. "This data shows that yield gains might be due to increased planting density, but also that yield per plant might have increased," said Stephen Smith, affiliate professor of agronomy, Iowa State University and retired research fellow at DuPont Pioneer. "If this is the case, then breeders will have found a level and class of genetic response that has mostly remained hidden. Additional studies will be needed to determine if there are additional genetic mechanisms at work contributing to yield. Hopefully, there are breeders who will be able to identify at least some of those and further increase that genetic contribution to yield gains." Others involved in the study were Yared Assefa, a postdoctoral researcher in Ciampitti's lab at Kansas State University; and Mark Hinds, Steve Paszkiewicz, Gaurav Bhalla, March Jeschke, and Ryan Schon with DuPont Pioneer.

(Video) Fridays in the Field- July 20, 2018

Chad Moyer hosts this week's Fridays in the Field. He visits with Nathan Schole from Hooper, NE. Click here to listen to the Midday audio.

Nebraska Farmer Sues Over Crop Damage From Herbicide

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — A Nebraska farmer has sued herbicide manufacturers, saying his neighbors' use of the company products damaged his soybean crop last summer. The Lincoln Journal Star reports that Shane Greckel filed the federal lawsuit last week against Monsanto and other companies whose products contain the herbicide dicamba. Experts say problems have arisen with dicamba as farmers began to use it to kill weeds in soybean and cotton fields where specially engineered seeds had been planted to resist the herbicide. Because it can easily evaporate after being applied, the chemical sometimes settles on neighboring fields planted with seeds that are not resistant to dicamba. Greckel says that's what happened on his fields near Bloomfield. Monsanto spokesman Jeff Neu told the Journal Star that the company hadn't yet been served with the lawsuit but would review it.

View All

Livestock

Texas meat-lovers appalled over WeWork's meat-free policy

HOUSTON  — Texas meat-lovers are expressing outrage over WeWork's announcement that it won't serve beef, pork or chicken at work events in order to be more environmentally conscious. The Houston Chronicle reports that the New York City-based coworking company with nine Texas facilities says it's committed to being a "meat-free organization." WeWork won't buy meat dishes at the shared workspaces provided to members, including its 8,000 Texas members. The company projects the move will save 16.7 billion gallons of water, 445 million pounds of CO2 emissions and more than 15 million animals by 2023. Texas Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller calls the rationale "a bunch of bull." Texas Beef Council Vice President Richard Wortham says the company should instead use less energy in their offices or encourage employees to take public transportation.

Evaluating Carcass Quality at the NJAS

Understanding how Angus cattle perform beyond the farm or ranch is an important component of the carcass steer contest hosted during the National Junior Angus Show (NJAS). Forty-two steers were a part of the 2018 NJAS carcass steer contest, where juniors were able to learn firsthand what ranchers are targeting when raising cattle. This year the NJAS was hosted in Madison, Wisconsin, July 8-13. At the NJAS, many animals were checked-in, exhibited and placed. Among these contests and shows was the Carcass Steer contest. The Carcass Steer contest is unique to the NJAS due to the fact that exhibitors don’t exactly “show” these steers; they send them off for harvest, evaluation and grading following check-in. Within a matter of days, the carcass merit of these steers was reported. The top steers were announced at the NJAS awards ceremony July 12. “The National Junior Angus Show has an incredible learning opportunity for junior members that participate in the carcass contest,” said Jaclyn Upperman, American Angus Association director of events and education. “Junior members feed and manage the steers to attempt to grade the highest quality carcass they can. This year, the numbers were up. That includes the number of entries, as well as the result numbers. We had 38 percent of the 42 entries graded Prime and 80 percent CAB; this is the best set of carcass steers harvested to date.” Forty-two entries from 13 states competed in the carcass class at the National Junior Angus Show, confirming that the Angus legacy will continue for generations to come. This contest shows the versatility that Angus cattle have, and how they can be beneficial to any producer. The top steers’ exhibitors were awarded contest premiums in addition to carcass premiums. In addition to prize money, contestants received carcass data back to influence future selection decisions. The grand champion carcass steer was exhibited by Alissa Martin, Oregon, Illinois. Her steer graded low-Prime with a yield grade of 2.5. The steer had a 15.1 square inch (sq. in.) ribeye area and had a hot-carcass weight of 826.8 pounds (lb.), which allowed the steer to qualify for the Certified Angus Beef ®(CAB) brand. Martin received a $30.00 per hundredweight (cwt.) grid premium. Alexis Vandeberghe, Cleveland, North Dakota, was awarded reserve grand champion carcass steer. Her steer graded low Prime with a yield grade of 2.5. The steer had a ribeye area of 14.8 sq. in. and a hot-carcass weight of 817.8 lb. Her steer also qualified for CAB, and Vandeberghe was awarded $30.00 cwt. grid premium. The grand champion bred-and-owned carcass was owned by Reagan Skow, Palisade, Nebraska. Her steer graded low Prime with a yield grade of 2.7. Her steer had a ribeye area of 12.2 sq. in. and a hot-carcass weight of 799.0 lb. His steer qualified for CAB, and Skow was award $28.00 cwt. grid premium. Aubrey Herbers, Lynchburg, Virginia, was awarded reserve grand champion bred-and-owned carcass steer. Her steer graded low Prime with a yield grade of 2.4. He had a ribeye area of 13.9 sq. in. and a hot-carcass weight of 790.6 lb. Her steer qualified for CAB, and Herbers was awarded $28.00 cwt. grid premium. State group was another aspect of the contest. Three steers were grouped together by no less than two exhibitors. Continuing their victory, Virginia won the first-place state group. The Virginia team was composed of Aubrey Herbers, Gordon Clark and Suter Clark both of Gretna. Winning second place in the state group carcass contest was South Dakota. This team consisted of Ty and Chase Mogck, both of Olivet.

Cattle on Feed Cattle Inventory *AUDIO*

OMAHA  -- Cattle and calves on feed for the slaughter market in the United States for feedlots with capacity of 1,000 or more head totaled 11.3 million head on July 1, 2018, USDA reported on Friday. The inventory was 4 percent above July 1, 2017. This is the highest July 1 inventory since the series began in 1996. Listen to Jerry Stowell, Country Futures, break down the report here: https://post.futurimedia.com/krvnam/playlist/cattle-on-feed-cattle-inventory-4685.html The inventory included 7.13 million steers and steer calves, up 2 percent from the previous year. This group accounted for 63 percent of the total inventory. Heifers and heifer calves accounted for 4.15 million head, up 8 percent from 2017. Placements in feedlots during June totaled 1.79 million head, 1 percent above 2017. Net placements were 1.74 million head. During June, placements of cattle and calves weighing less than 600 pounds were 400,000 head, 600-699 pounds were 345,000 head, 700-799 pounds were 385,000 head, 800-899 pounds were 378,000 head, 900-999 pounds were 185,000 head, and 1,000 pounds and greater were 100,000 head. Marketings of fed cattle during June totaled 2.01 million head, 1 percent above 2017. Other disappearance totaled 58,000 head during June, 4 percent above 2017. CATTLE INVENTORY All cattle and calves in the United States on July 1, 2018 totaled 103 million head, 1 percent above the 102 million head on July 1, 2017. All cows and heifers that have calved, at 41.9 million head, were 1 percent above the 41.6 million head on July 1, 2017. Beef cows, at 32.5 million head, were up 1 percent from a year ago. Milk cows, at 9.40 million head, were unchanged from previous year. All heifers 500 pounds and over on July 1, 2018 totaled 16.3 million head, 1 percent above the 16.2 million head on July 1, 2017. Beef replacement heifers, at 4.60 million head, were down 2 percent from a year ago. Milk replacement heifers, at 4.20 million head, were unchanged from previous year. Other heifers, at 7.50 million head, were 3 percent above a year earlier. Steers 500 pounds and over on July 1, 2018 totaled 14.5 million head, unchanged from July 1, 2017. Bulls 500 pounds and over on July 1, 2018 totaled 2.10 million head, up 5 percent from July 1, 2017. Calves under 500 pounds on July 1, 2018 totaled 28.4 million head, up 2 percent from July 1, 2017. Cattle and calves on feed for the slaughter market in the United States for all feedlots totaled 13.3 million head on July 1, 2018. The inventory is up 4 percent from the July 1, 2017 total of 12.8 million head. Cattle on feed in feedlots with capacity of 1,000 or more head accounted for 84.8 percent of the total cattle on feed on July 1, 2018, up slightly from previous year. The combined total of calves under 500 pounds and other heifers and steers over 500 pounds (outside of feedlots) is 37.1 million head. This is 1 percent above the 36.9 million head on July 1, 2017. To view the full Cattle on Feed and Cattle reports, visit https://www.nass.usda.gov USDA Actual Average Guess Range Cattle on Feed: On Feed July 1 104.0% 104.0% 102.5-106.0% Placed in June 101.0% 101.5% 95.5-106.5% Marketed in June 101.0% 101.0% 98.5-106.5% USDA Actual Average Guess Range July 1 Cattle* All Cattle 101.0% NA NA Total Cows 101.0% NA NA Beef Cows 101.0% NA NA Milk Cows 100.0% NA NA Total Heifers Over 500# 101.0% NA NA Beef Replacements 98.0% NA NA Milk Replacements 100.0% NA NA Other Heifers 103.0% NA NA Steers 500# Plus 100.0% NA NA Bulls 500# Plus 105.0% NA NA Calves Under 500# 102.0% NA NA 2017 Calf Crop 102.0% NA NA

View All

Technology

30 Years of Data on Optimum Plant Density and Yield gains for Corn Recognized in Scientific Reports

DES MOINES, Iowa – A collaboration between Kansas State University and DuPont Pioneer Agronomy analyzing 30 years of corn plant population responses shows that as agronomic optimum plant density increased, the range for maximizing yields also widened. DuPont Pioneer has collected data on corn plant population responses and yield gains to provide better information on hybrids. From 1987 to 2015, nearly 200,000 yield and plant population data points were collected from more than 40 locations throughout North America. In collaboration with Pioneer, the data was analyzed by Ignacio Ciampitti, an associate professor in crop production and cropping systems at Kansas State University, and his team. Recently, the study was published in Scientific Reports and recognized for its discovery of trends in optimum plant density and yield gains. Analysis of 30 years of corn plant population responses shows that as agronomic optimum plant density increased, the range for maximizing corn yields also widened. This means modern hybrids benefit from increased plant populations without the previous instability that resulted from higher populations. Study findings show a 53-bushel-per-acre yield increase. "It used to be that we were primarily achieving yield gains by improving the plant density tolerance, but there is evidence from this and other recent studies that we are seeing yield per plant increasing," said Paul Carter, DuPont Pioneer agronomy manager. Key findings The average agronomic optimum plant density across environments and hybrids increased from 30,500 plants per acre from 1987 to 1991 to 37,900 plants per acre from 2012 to 2016. During the first five years, the range of optimal agronomic plant density was narrow but increased over time. "This indicates that modern hybrids not only need more plants in order to push for higher yields, but also they are showing a stability that the old hybrids did not. For farmers, that means they have some leverage," Ciampitti said. "It's really unique to have this amount of data, from multiple sites, across that many years in order to track plant density and its relationship to corn yields." Over the duration of the study, average corn yield over all locations at the agronomic optimum plant density increased from 135 bushels per acre in 1987 to 188 bushels per acre in 2015, representing an overall yield gain of 53 bushels per acre. As the agronomic optimum plant density increased, the range for maximizing corn yields also widened. New elite hybrids are credited for these increases in yield per plant. "This data shows that yield gains might be due to increased planting density, but also that yield per plant might have increased," said Stephen Smith, affiliate professor of agronomy, Iowa State University and retired research fellow at DuPont Pioneer. "If this is the case, then breeders will have found a level and class of genetic response that has mostly remained hidden. Additional studies will be needed to determine if there are additional genetic mechanisms at work contributing to yield. Hopefully, there are breeders who will be able to identify at least some of those and further increase that genetic contribution to yield gains." Others involved in the study were Yared Assefa, a postdoctoral researcher in Ciampitti's lab at Kansas State University; and Mark Hinds, Steve Paszkiewicz, Gaurav Bhalla, March Jeschke, and Ryan Schon with DuPont Pioneer.

As Farmers Grow Drone Use, Privacy Issues Top List of Concerns

PRINCETON, N.J.-- The popularity of drones is flourishing on the farm. Three in four U.S. farmers (74%) are currently using or considering adopting the technology to assess, monitor and manage their farm according to an April 2018 Munich Reinsurance America, Inc. survey of 269 U.S. farmers. Seventy-six percent (76%) of all respondents have concerns related to drone usage: privacy issues (23%) topped the list, followed by cyber security concerns over data captured and transferred (20%), and potential damage or injury from the drone (17%). “As Federal Aviation Administration regulations open up the skies to the use of commercial drones, we are seeing a growing investment in the technology by farmers focused on precision agriculture or smart farming,” said Jason Dunn, Strategic Products Expert, Munich Reinsurance America, Inc. “Whether a farm has less than 100 or more than 5,000 acres, drones can be the eyes and ears for farmers that want to efficiently and cost effectively monitor and manage crops, livestock and soil conditions. However, farmers may be exposing their business to new risks related to drone usage, and their insurance coverage may not have kept pace with the rapid development and use of this technology.” Of those who currently use the technology, it is nearly split between farmers who contract with an outside company to operate their drones (49%) and farmers who handle drone usage on their own (51%). Eighty-three percent (83%) of respondents use drones on their farms either daily or once a week or more. Drones are used for or considered being used for crop monitoring (73%), soil and field analysis (46%), and health assessment of [crops and livestock] (43%). “Fortunately, a majority of farmers are talking to their insurance company about their drone usage,” said Dunn. Sixty-five percent (65%) of survey respondents using drones have informed their insurance company; 16% plan to do so. “Traditional commercial insurance policies don’t cover or offer very limited liability protection for drones. Farmers should speak with their agents or brokers to insure that their policy protects against privacy claims as well as bodily injury and property damage incurred as a result of drone usage.” Munich Re America offers a Drone Liability Endorsement that can be attached to an existing commercial general liability insurance policy purchased through a participating insurance carrier. The endorsement, which provides bodily injury and property damage liability and/or personal injury liability coverage for drones that are under 55 pounds, is designed for small to medium size businesses and farm and agricultural operations in the U.S. Methodology This online survey was conducted by Qualtrics, which conducts research to capture customer, product, brand and employee experience insights, in April 2018 and is intended to represent the views of 269 U.S. farmers who participated.

Montana Researchers Pioneer Using Wool for Erosion Control

The stuff of socks, sweaters and high-tech underwear now has yet another use, according to a Montana State University study: revegetating roadsides to prevent erosion. At a road cut along Highway 287 near Three Forks, Mont., healthy patches of native grasses are a testament to the lasting benefits of using wool, said Rob Ament, a research scientist at the Western Transportation Institute in MSU's Norm Asbjornson College of Engineering. When Ament's research team began the project four years ago, they suspected that wool might have advantages over the straw and shredded coconut hull used in traditional erosion control blankets, which buffer slopes against sun and rain until seeds germinate and plants take hold. The results of the recently concluded study, however, surprised him. "We were astonished by the vigorous plant growth," Ament said during a recent visit to the site. At the square-meter plots that received erosion blankets made of wool blended with straw, the team observed three to four times more perennial grasses - a result Ament called "stunning." Eli Cuelho, a former research engineer at WTI, also contributed to the project, as did Stuart Jennings and Monica Pokorny at KC Harvey Environmental, a Bozeman-based consulting firm specializing in reclamation. Pokorny, who now works as a plant materials specialist at the Bozeman office of the Natural Resources Conservation Service, worked with Ament to develop the wool products and conduct the field trials. Revegetating disturbed ground along roadsides is required by various laws to prevent takeover by noxious weeds and runoff of sediment, which can harm fish and other aquatic life, and it also contributes to the longevity of the roadbed by reducing pooling water, according to Phil Johnson. He oversaw roadside reclamation for the Montana Department of Transportation for 25 years before retiring in 2017. Johnson provided guidance for the project, which received an MDT grant, and was "very pleased," he said. Prior to the experiment, MDT had seeded the road cut in a traditional manner with a seed drill. But the plants on the exposed, west-facing slope had difficulty surviving, and the agency recommended the road cut for the experiment, according to Ament. "We picked a really harsh site," Ament said. "We didn't want it to be easy." Some erosion-preventing wool products were available internationally, Ament said. But they were prohibitively expensive to ship and weren't designed specifically for revegetation. "We had to be creative and work with wool producers here in Montana," he said. Ament and Pokorny traveled to three Montana mills and worked with them to produce shredded wool, which was then sent to a Minnesota manufacturer with the specialized equipment for blending the wool with straw to produce the erosion blankets. The researchers then seeded the Highway 287 road cut with native grasses and laid down the wool erosion blankets side by side with various other erosion blankets. They observed the site periodically and measured the growth of the grasses during the course of three years. "We don't know what mechanisms, exactly, give wool an advantage," Ament said. He suspects that the wool holds more moisture for a longer period. And wool, which is about 17 percent nitrogen, likely has a fertilizing effect on the plants as it slowly biodegrades. Ament said that wool also appears to adhere better to soil on steep embankments. Ament noted that if wool were widely adopted for erosion control, it could support local manufacturing of the blankets as well as create a significant new market for Montana's wool growers. Low-grade wool that is otherwise discarded could potentially be used.

View All

Ag Policy

Texas meat-lovers appalled over WeWork's meat-free policy

HOUSTON  — Texas meat-lovers are expressing outrage over WeWork's announcement that it won't serve beef, pork or chicken at work events in order to be more environmentally conscious. The Houston Chronicle reports that the New York City-based coworking company with nine Texas facilities says it's committed to being a "meat-free organization." WeWork won't buy meat dishes at the shared workspaces provided to members, including its 8,000 Texas members. The company projects the move will save 16.7 billion gallons of water, 445 million pounds of CO2 emissions and more than 15 million animals by 2023. Texas Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller calls the rationale "a bunch of bull." Texas Beef Council Vice President Richard Wortham says the company should instead use less energy in their offices or encourage employees to take public transportation.

Perdue: Tariffs not the Ultimate Answer

“Tariffs are not the ultimate answer,” says Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue. Speaking to the Washington International Trade Association, Perdue told the group tariffs are rather “a tool to get people’s attention” so both teams “play by the same rules.” Politico reports that Perdue recognized retaliation by China, Mexico, Canada and the European Union to Trump’s tariffs was causing pain in farm country, but he tried to frame it in an optimistically. Perdue said he told the President Wednesday when asked how things are in farm country: "I can't lie to you. It's a little bit like a weight loss program. It's painful when you're going through, but we think there's going to be better days ahead." The comments came the day the House Ways and Means committee heard from farmers and ranchers on the harm the ongoing trade war is causing. A current consensus seems to be that agriculture understands trade could be better when the dust settles, but an American Farm Bureau Federation representative says the decisions made now could be costly for farmers and ranchers.

(Video) Top Agriculture News -- Friday Five

This week's edition of Friday Five, presented by the Nebraska Corn Board, is a review of five headline stories in agriculture from the past week. STORIES: 5) Unexpected Tornadoes in Iowa 4) Who Will Regulate Fake Meat? 3) Corn Congress, Deb Gangwish Elected to NCGA Corn Board 2) House Moves Farm Bill Forward 1) Celebrate National Ice Cream Day

View All

Markets

View More
Corn Congress 2018
Rural Radio Forum - Stress in Agriculture KRVN KNEB KTIC KAWL KXSP - Omaha KSID - Sidney KCSR - Chadron KNCY - Nebraska City KWBE - Beatrice/Fairbury