class="home blog group-blog masthead-fixed list-view full-width grid wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-6.2.0 vc_responsive"
Rural Radio Network | Affiliates Rural Radio Network site

Rural Radio Network

The Wednesday Fontanelle Final Bell with Arlan Suderman of StoneX

There was plenty to talk about coming off of the USDA report that sent corn, soybeans, and wheat sharply higher but also threw a wrench in cattle trade. Arlan is keeping an eye on weather in both South America and the Black Sea Region. He also breaks down cash trade in cattle and why hogs are still ...

Read More
story slider pointer

The Wednesday Fontanelle Final Bell with Arlan Suderman of StoneX

There was plenty to talk about coming off of the USDA report that sent corn, soybeans, and wheat sharply higher but also threw a wrench in cattle trade. Arlan is keeping an eye on weather in both South America and the Black Sea Region. He also breaks down cash trade in cattle and why hogs are still ...

Read More

AUDIO: Market Commentary with Daily Brokers

Summary Wednesday was a day with a more risk on feeling than some expected. Traders were able to look past the death of statesmanship with the first Presidential debate and onto the end of the quarter. Economic data was strong on Wednesday and that really helped to bring the bulls back, but there...

Read More

Safety, design top priorities when designing cattle processing facilities

Many a rancher will say there is nothing that tests the bonds of a relationship more than processing cattle together. Between the quick movements of the calves and the short tempers of the humans it can be a trying experience for all. One way to help ease some of the potential for frustration is to...

Read More

Amid turmoil, officials commit to future of Aksarben Stock Show

Questions have swirled on social media about the future of the Aksarben Stock Show following the termination of Greg Harder who served as the show director and livestock director for the Nebraska State Fair. On Wednesday, officials from the State Fair and Askarben Foundation affirmed their commit...

Read More

Fischer introduces legislation for the safe transport of ag and livestock products

U.S. Senator Deb Fischer has introduced Legislation to extend hours of service exemptions in agriculture to year-round. The bill would amend the Moter Carrier Safety Improvement Act of 1999 to modify certain ag exemptions. Know as the Haulers of Agriculture and Livestock Safety (HAULS) Act, Fi...

Read More

Crops

The Wednesday Fontanelle Final Bell with Arlan Suderman of StoneX

There was plenty to talk about coming off of the USDA report that sent corn, soybeans, and wheat sharply higher but also threw a wrench in cattle trade. Arlan is keeping an eye on weather in both South America and the Black Sea Region. He also breaks down cash trade in cattle and why hogs are still trying to sort out their latest report almost a week later.  

AUDIO: Market Commentary with Daily Brokers

Summary Wednesday was a day with a more risk on feeling than some expected. Traders were able to look past the death of statesmanship with the first Presidential debate and onto the end of the quarter. Economic data was strong on Wednesday and that really helped to bring the bulls back, but there was still some safe haven buying in the precious metals. The pending home sales index is a leading indicator of housing activity, looking at signed contracts that have not yet closed. It typically takes four to six weeks to close a contracted sale. The August index surged 8.8% month-on-month to a record high 132.8, up from 122.1 in July and well-above the average analyst estimate of 3.1% growth. Contract signings are up a robust 24.2% year-on-year as the housing industry remains red hot. An index of 100 is equal to the base year of 2001. Tuesday's Redbook retails sales showed that same-store retail sales were up 2.2% year-on-year in the week ending September 26, after being up 1.5% the previous week. This is a good sign for third quarter retail sales. Robust sales slowed as coronavirus numbers rose in July, but then rose again in August as numbers declined. Manufacturing is also starting to pick back up in the country with the Dallas Fed manufacturing survey index jumping to 13.6 for September, up from 8.0 in July and up from the average analyst estimate of 8.5. The region's production index rose to 22.3 for September, up from 13.1 in July. The Dallas Fed's report indicates that factory activity within Texas expanded for the fourth consecutive month following a record contraction earlier in the year due to the Covid-19 pandemic. The Federal Reserve is saying it believes the US GDP will shrink 3% in 2020, but grow 3.5% in 2021. The Fed also announced on Tuesday that M1 money supply (the most readily available cash in the economy like checking accounts and physical cash) was at an all time high of $5.6 trillion. Mike Zuzolo, Global Commodity Analytics, pointed out in his midday market commentary that M1 could be looking for a home with commodities as Gold was on weekly highs. The grain market went full risk on mode following the USDA quarterly stocks report. USDA dropped below analyst estimates for all three major grains. USDA reduced corn stocks to 1.995 billion bushels down from 2.221 billion bushels in 2019. Soybean stocks were reduced to 523 million bushels. Down from 909 million bushels in 2019. Wheat 3rd quarter stocks were dropped to 2.159 billion bushels from 2.346 billion in 2019. USDA also changed the final number on the 2019 corn crop slightly higher to 13.620 billion, but the stocks number supports stronger feed usage in both the past and current marketing years. John Payne, Daniels Ag Marketing mentioned in his afternoon commentary that the October WASDE may not quite support today's data and that continued dry conditions would be needed in South America to help support the current rally. Exports continue to be ahead of year ago levels. Monday's USDA export inspections showed wheat inspected for export at 563,000 MT up 60,000 MT from last week. Year to date wheat exports are about 700,000 MT ahead of 2019. Dry weather conditions also look to persist across the hard red winter wheat belt in the US. As for soybeans after several weeks of a strong run up the sellers continue in the market. Likely the selling is a combination of managed money lightening their long position which has neared record numbers. China is also going into their Golden Week Holiday starting Thursday and will likely be out of the market for the next week to two weeks. USDA export sales started strong this week with unknown purchasing 207,140 MT of corn and 218,300 MT of soybeans. Japan purchased 110,800 MT of corn on Monday. Tuesday USDA announced a flash sale of 100,000 MT of soybeans to Mexico. On Wednesday USDA announced a flash sale of 215,000 MT of soybeans to unknown destinations. In the livestock complex on Wednesday roles were reversed from Tuesday. Lean hogs closed higher with support from the soybean complex and Germany finding 2 more cases of African Swine fever. Thursday's export sales numbers are expected to be strong with China possibly front loading their demand going into Golden week. Cattle on the other hand saw spreads with grains start to unwind. Feeder were the leader to the down side with the most technical pressure. Cash for feeders still seems to be fairly strong with sale barns across the Midwest reporting steady to slightly lower prices. In the country there has been quiet through mid week. Asking prices continue to firm in the South at $109. Northern asking prices are still not fully established, but packers are bidding $167 dressed in Iowa and Nebraska. The Fed Cattle Exchange Auction today listed a total of 901 head, of which 358 actually sold, but 543 head were listed as PO (Passed Offer). The state by state breakdown looks like this: KS 142 total head (1 lot), with 142 head listed as PO ($104.00); NE 214 total head (1 lot), with 214 head sold at $106.00; TX 545 total head (3 lots), with 144 head sold at $106.00, and 401 head listed as PO ($104.00). The delivery date/weighted averages breakdown is as listed: 1-9 day delivery: 543 head total, all passed, and 1-17 day delivery 358 head total all sold at $106.00. For the week ending September 19, 2020, Imported Beef Passed for Entry in the U.S. totaled 43,255, 118.87% of the previous week and 101.14% of the 4-week average.   Expected Slaughter numbers Wednesday Cattle 121,000 hd today Hogs 484,000 hd today   Midday Carcass Value Wednesday Beef Choice up 1.48 218.64 Select up 0.94 207.93 C/S Spread 10.71 Loads  97 Pork Carcass dn 0.55 31.20 Bellies dn 1.66 145.95 Loads 190 Grain Settlements Corn up 7 1/2 - 14 1/4 Soybeans up 14 3/4 - 30 1/2 Chicago Wht up 19 1/4 - 28 1/2 Kansas City Wht up 27 1/4 - 33 3/4 Livestock Settlements Live Cattle dn 0.77 up 0.22 Feeder Cattle dn 1.00 - 1.72 Lean Hogs up 0.42 - 1.12 Class III Milk dn 0.02 up 0.25 Pre-Opening Market Broker Commentary Mark Gold, Top Third Ag Marketing, discusses overnight grains and what the trade may see today. End of the month and quarter. Along with a big USDA report. Jerry Stowell, Country Futures,  looks at what may impact the livestock futures today. If feeders can hold cash could move higher again this week. Mike Zuzolo, Global Commodity Analytics, takes a look at the midday trade. The quarterly stocks report from USDA was very friendly to the grain complex. John Payne, Daniel's Ag Marketing, takes a closer look at today's grain close. The quarterly stocks report was friendly to the grains, but South American weather will need to stay dry to maintain gains. Jack Fenske, York Commodities, looks at the closing market numbers. Grains got a friendly USDA report and gained several new points of support.

Six Neb. counties designated primary natural disaster areas

Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue designated six Nebraska counties as primary natural disaster areas. Producers in Colfax, Cuming, Dawes, Dodge, Stanton and Thurston counties who suffered losses caused by recent drought may be eligible for U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Farm Service Agency (FSA) emergency loans. This natural disaster designation allows FSA to extend much-needed emergency credit to producers recovering from natural disasters. Emergency loans can be used to meet various recovery needs including the replacement of essential items such as equipment or livestock, reorganization of a farming operation or the refinance of certain debts. Producers in the contiguous counties listed below are also eligible to apply for emergency loans: Nebraska: Box Butte, Burt, Butler, Dakota, Dixon, Douglas, Madison, Pierce, Platte, Saunders, Sheridan, Sioux, Washington and Wayne Iowa: Monona and Woodbury South Dakota: Fall River and Oglala Lakota The deadline to apply for these emergency loans is May 11, 2021. FSA will review the loans based on the extent of losses, security available and repayment ability. FSA has a variety of additional programs to help farmers recover from the impacts of this disaster. FSA programs that do not require a disaster declaration include: Emergency Assistance for Livestock, Honeybees and Farm-Raised Fish Program; Emergency Conservation Program; Livestock Forage Disaster Program; Livestock Indemnity Program; Operating and Farm Ownership Loans; and the Tree Assistance Program. Farmers may contact their local USDA service center for further information on eligibility requirements and application procedures for these and other programs. Additional information is also available online at farmers.gov/recover.

View All

Livestock

The Wednesday Fontanelle Final Bell with Arlan Suderman of StoneX

There was plenty to talk about coming off of the USDA report that sent corn, soybeans, and wheat sharply higher but also threw a wrench in cattle trade. Arlan is keeping an eye on weather in both South America and the Black Sea Region. He also breaks down cash trade in cattle and why hogs are still trying to sort out their latest report almost a week later.  

AUDIO: Market Commentary with Daily Brokers

Summary Wednesday was a day with a more risk on feeling than some expected. Traders were able to look past the death of statesmanship with the first Presidential debate and onto the end of the quarter. Economic data was strong on Wednesday and that really helped to bring the bulls back, but there was still some safe haven buying in the precious metals. The pending home sales index is a leading indicator of housing activity, looking at signed contracts that have not yet closed. It typically takes four to six weeks to close a contracted sale. The August index surged 8.8% month-on-month to a record high 132.8, up from 122.1 in July and well-above the average analyst estimate of 3.1% growth. Contract signings are up a robust 24.2% year-on-year as the housing industry remains red hot. An index of 100 is equal to the base year of 2001. Tuesday's Redbook retails sales showed that same-store retail sales were up 2.2% year-on-year in the week ending September 26, after being up 1.5% the previous week. This is a good sign for third quarter retail sales. Robust sales slowed as coronavirus numbers rose in July, but then rose again in August as numbers declined. Manufacturing is also starting to pick back up in the country with the Dallas Fed manufacturing survey index jumping to 13.6 for September, up from 8.0 in July and up from the average analyst estimate of 8.5. The region's production index rose to 22.3 for September, up from 13.1 in July. The Dallas Fed's report indicates that factory activity within Texas expanded for the fourth consecutive month following a record contraction earlier in the year due to the Covid-19 pandemic. The Federal Reserve is saying it believes the US GDP will shrink 3% in 2020, but grow 3.5% in 2021. The Fed also announced on Tuesday that M1 money supply (the most readily available cash in the economy like checking accounts and physical cash) was at an all time high of $5.6 trillion. Mike Zuzolo, Global Commodity Analytics, pointed out in his midday market commentary that M1 could be looking for a home with commodities as Gold was on weekly highs. The grain market went full risk on mode following the USDA quarterly stocks report. USDA dropped below analyst estimates for all three major grains. USDA reduced corn stocks to 1.995 billion bushels down from 2.221 billion bushels in 2019. Soybean stocks were reduced to 523 million bushels. Down from 909 million bushels in 2019. Wheat 3rd quarter stocks were dropped to 2.159 billion bushels from 2.346 billion in 2019. USDA also changed the final number on the 2019 corn crop slightly higher to 13.620 billion, but the stocks number supports stronger feed usage in both the past and current marketing years. John Payne, Daniels Ag Marketing mentioned in his afternoon commentary that the October WASDE may not quite support today's data and that continued dry conditions would be needed in South America to help support the current rally. Exports continue to be ahead of year ago levels. Monday's USDA export inspections showed wheat inspected for export at 563,000 MT up 60,000 MT from last week. Year to date wheat exports are about 700,000 MT ahead of 2019. Dry weather conditions also look to persist across the hard red winter wheat belt in the US. As for soybeans after several weeks of a strong run up the sellers continue in the market. Likely the selling is a combination of managed money lightening their long position which has neared record numbers. China is also going into their Golden Week Holiday starting Thursday and will likely be out of the market for the next week to two weeks. USDA export sales started strong this week with unknown purchasing 207,140 MT of corn and 218,300 MT of soybeans. Japan purchased 110,800 MT of corn on Monday. Tuesday USDA announced a flash sale of 100,000 MT of soybeans to Mexico. On Wednesday USDA announced a flash sale of 215,000 MT of soybeans to unknown destinations. In the livestock complex on Wednesday roles were reversed from Tuesday. Lean hogs closed higher with support from the soybean complex and Germany finding 2 more cases of African Swine fever. Thursday's export sales numbers are expected to be strong with China possibly front loading their demand going into Golden week. Cattle on the other hand saw spreads with grains start to unwind. Feeder were the leader to the down side with the most technical pressure. Cash for feeders still seems to be fairly strong with sale barns across the Midwest reporting steady to slightly lower prices. In the country there has been quiet through mid week. Asking prices continue to firm in the South at $109. Northern asking prices are still not fully established, but packers are bidding $167 dressed in Iowa and Nebraska. The Fed Cattle Exchange Auction today listed a total of 901 head, of which 358 actually sold, but 543 head were listed as PO (Passed Offer). The state by state breakdown looks like this: KS 142 total head (1 lot), with 142 head listed as PO ($104.00); NE 214 total head (1 lot), with 214 head sold at $106.00; TX 545 total head (3 lots), with 144 head sold at $106.00, and 401 head listed as PO ($104.00). The delivery date/weighted averages breakdown is as listed: 1-9 day delivery: 543 head total, all passed, and 1-17 day delivery 358 head total all sold at $106.00. For the week ending September 19, 2020, Imported Beef Passed for Entry in the U.S. totaled 43,255, 118.87% of the previous week and 101.14% of the 4-week average.   Expected Slaughter numbers Wednesday Cattle 121,000 hd today Hogs 484,000 hd today   Midday Carcass Value Wednesday Beef Choice up 1.48 218.64 Select up 0.94 207.93 C/S Spread 10.71 Loads  97 Pork Carcass dn 0.55 31.20 Bellies dn 1.66 145.95 Loads 190 Grain Settlements Corn up 7 1/2 - 14 1/4 Soybeans up 14 3/4 - 30 1/2 Chicago Wht up 19 1/4 - 28 1/2 Kansas City Wht up 27 1/4 - 33 3/4 Livestock Settlements Live Cattle dn 0.77 up 0.22 Feeder Cattle dn 1.00 - 1.72 Lean Hogs up 0.42 - 1.12 Class III Milk dn 0.02 up 0.25 Pre-Opening Market Broker Commentary Mark Gold, Top Third Ag Marketing, discusses overnight grains and what the trade may see today. End of the month and quarter. Along with a big USDA report. Jerry Stowell, Country Futures,  looks at what may impact the livestock futures today. If feeders can hold cash could move higher again this week. Mike Zuzolo, Global Commodity Analytics, takes a look at the midday trade. The quarterly stocks report from USDA was very friendly to the grain complex. John Payne, Daniel's Ag Marketing, takes a closer look at today's grain close. The quarterly stocks report was friendly to the grains, but South American weather will need to stay dry to maintain gains. Jack Fenske, York Commodities, looks at the closing market numbers. Grains got a friendly USDA report and gained several new points of support.

Safety, design top priorities when designing cattle processing facilities

Many a rancher will say there is nothing that tests the bonds of a relationship more than processing cattle together. Between the quick movements of the calves and the short tempers of the humans it can be a trying experience for all. One way to help ease some of the potential for frustration is to make sure cattle are worked through good facilities. Remodeling or overhauling cattle facilities was the topic of discussion on a recent Kansas State University Beef Cattle Institute Cattle Chat podcast featuring K-State veterinarians Bob Larson and Brad White, beef cattle extension specialist Bob Weaber and special guest Chase DeCoite, beef quality assurance director with the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association. “It is important to know how you are going to use your facilities when planning a remodel of them,” DeCoite said. And Weaber said that starts with evaluating your current set-up. “Look at the age of the facility and the types of materials within the structure,” Weaber said. “If the facility is 50 years old with gates made of wood panels patched together and there are drainage issues, it might be time for a total rebuild.” In that case, Weaber advised producers reach out to a local soil conservation district professional, Extension watershed specialist, or an environmental specialist with your state Department of Health and Environment or Department of Agriculture to help plan the location of the new facility and assist with permitting. However, the experts agreed that a total rebuild isn’t always needed and that many facilities can be improved with a remodel that will strengthen the pens and improve safety for all involved. “Any cattle handling facility needs to be safe for both the people and the cattle,” Larson said. “The materials need to be sturdy and the gates need to be placed so that people can open them safely and cattle can move through them easily.” To test the people placement and cattle flow, DeCoite recommended that cattle producers move the animals through their facility without actually applying any processing procedures. In doing so, he said, cattle producers are training the cattle on how to move through the facility. “This will allow you to see how cattle and people are interacting within your facility and help you design a better system,” DeCoite said. Along with that, White advised producers to to use other producers’ facilities in order to identify features that they like and that they want to avoid for their own facilities. “They may use other equipment, which will allow you to observe the pros and cons of their cattle handling systems,” he said. White also encouraged cattle producers and their employees to attend a stockman’s training to get advice on how to best work with the cattle. Here were the top tips that the experts offered when planning a facilities remodel: Determine the appropriate scope of the project. Is it a simple repair or an involved remodel? Attend a stockman’s school to learn how to best use the facilities. Visit other facilities to do research. Consider both human and cattle safety in the design. Build with the appropriate size and strength of materials for your class of animals. Plan accordingly to make sure you are maximizing the facilities investment.

View All

Technology

Student, host community applications open for 2021 Rural Fellows program

The Rural Fellows program is now accepting applications for their 2021 program for both students and host communities. The program, which began in 2013, is seeking 200 college students and 100 host communities for a 10-week summer internship experience. That's a 10-fold increase from last year's program, which sent 15 students to 7 communities across Nebraska. The Rural Fellows internships take place from mid-May through late July 2021. The summer projects range in topics, including entrepreneurship, economic and business development, and early childhood development.  “The Rural Fellows program, through the student interns, connects the research of UNL faculty to rural Nebraska communities,” said Helen Fagan, Rural Fellows program coordinator. “At the same time, the program gives participating students a close-up view of the leadership and innovation taking place in rural communities across the state, as well as deep, personal ties across Nebraska.” The program is open to first-year college students through graduate students at any college in Nebraska. The application deadline for students is November 15. The application deadline for host communities is Oct. 30.  Students and communities can learn more at ruralprosperityne.unl.edu/rural-fellows.

Midwest lawmakers Seek Funding for Missouri River Navigation

Lawmakers from Lower Missouri River states this week penned a letter urging the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to provide additional funding for navigation projects along the river. The lawmakers say many farmers, industries and small businesses in the Midwest rely on the Missouri River to transport goods. High water levels and record flooding in 2019 have prevented the Corps of Engineers from completing repairs on water infrastructure projects, which has led to dangerous accidents that have significantly disrupted commerce on the river. The lawmakers write, “there is a critically dire situation related to navigation challenges in several areas along the Missouri River where serious barge traffic accidents have occurred.” The Corps’ Kansas City District has received $20 million in emergency supplemental funds to conduct work along the navigation channel. However, the lawmakers estimate the need at $200 million. The Corps estimates that high water in the last three years damaged 50-75 percent of the 7,000 river training structures that make up the Bank Stabilization and Navigation Project.

Rural Radio Network partners with Aksarben to livestream livestock shows

The Rural Radio Network recently announced that it has partnered with the Aksarben Stock Show to provide livestream videos of the livestock shows. The show will take place Sept. 25-27, 2020. The livestream will begin on Sept. 25 at 9 am, beginning with the Breeding Doe Show. Shows can be viewed on Rural Radio Network station KRVN’s YouTube Channel. Find the full show schedule here.

View All

Ag Policy

NDA director named president of midwest ag association

The head of the Nebraska Department of Agriculture (NDA) has been tapped to lead the Midwest Association of State Departments of Agriculture (MASDA). NDA Director Steve Wellman accepted the role of 2021-2022 President of MASDA during the Association’s annual meeting, which was held virtually earlier in September. MASDA is comprised of the Departments of Agriculture from 13 Midwestern states. In addition to Nebraska, MASDA includes Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Dakota and Wisconsin. According to a news release from the NDA, in the role, Wellman will work with other state agricultural leaders in the Midwest to promote, support and advance ag producers, agribusinesses and the industry as a whole. “MASDA is where state ag leaders come together to represent agriculture in the Midwest,” Wellman said. “Each of our states has unique ag specialties and challenges, but we also share common goals, like creating new markets for our ag products and building on existing ones. This group addresses those challenges and goals and gives a unified voice to ag producers and agribusinesses in the Midwest.” Wellman will host the annual MASDA meeting in Nebraska in June of 2021.

Agreement reached to include CCC funds in CR

After days of partisan politics, a continuing resolution passed the House of Representatives Tuesday night including funds for the Commodity Credit Corporation. The White House and Congressional Republicans reached an agreement with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi to include the funding, while prohibiting oil companies from accessing CCC funds. The Trump administration was exploring a plan to use up to $300 million of CCC funds for the oil industry, but dropped the proposal this week. In a statement, Pelosi says, “We have reached an agreement with Republicans on the CR to add nearly $8 billion in desperately needed nutrition assistance for hungry schoolchildren and families. We also increase accountability in the Commodity Credit Corporation, preventing funds for farmers from being misused for a Big Oil bailout.” Senate Agriculture Committee Chairman Pat Roberts, previously critical of Democrats withholding the funds, stated, “Democrats have heard our call, and the calls from farm country, to not ignore rural America when funding the government.” The CR funds the government through December 11.

USDA Seeks Comments on Pasture, Rangeland, Forage Rainfall Index Insurance Program

The Department of Agriculture seeks public comments on recommended improvements to the Pasture, Rangeland, Forage Rainfall Index Crop Insurance Program by November 5, 2020. USDA’s Risk Management Agency contracted for an independent evaluation of the program to determine its effectiveness as a risk management tool for livestock producers. RMA Administrator Martin Barbre says, “We want to be sure that the recommendations RMA implements are good for the industry and good for livestock producers.” In addition to the PRF program, the recommendations could be applied to other Rainfall Index programs such as beekeeping and Annual Forage. RMA will review all comments and determine what recommendations should be implemented for the 2022 crop year. The independent evaluation includes several recommendations, including adjusting the County Base Value productivity range, better targeting of indemnities, and focusing on viable forage production areas. Other recommendations include focusing on coverage on risk-reducing intervals and taking an alternative approach to reducing frequent shallow losses.

View All

Markets

View More